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Feasibility study of advanced nom-reduction by hollow fiber ultrafiltration and nanofiltration at a Swedish surface water treatment plant

Lidén, Angelica LU and Persson, Kenneth M. LU (2016) In Water 8(4).
Abstract

Membrane technology, i.e., ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, is growing in popularity, as it is a space efficient alternative for surface water treatment. Two types of hollow fiber membranes were tested in a fully equipped and automated pilot at a Swedish water treatment plant. Raw water was treated by a nanofilter and by coagulation before an ultrafilter. Operation parameters recorded during these trials have been the basis for cost estimations and assessments of environmental impact, comparing the two membrane modules to the existing conventional treatment. The membranes required lower chemical consumption, but led to increased costs from membrane modules and a higher energy demand. Compared to the existing treatment (0.33... (More)

Membrane technology, i.e., ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, is growing in popularity, as it is a space efficient alternative for surface water treatment. Two types of hollow fiber membranes were tested in a fully equipped and automated pilot at a Swedish water treatment plant. Raw water was treated by a nanofilter and by coagulation before an ultrafilter. Operation parameters recorded during these trials have been the basis for cost estimations and assessments of environmental impact, comparing the two membrane modules to the existing conventional treatment. The membranes required lower chemical consumption, but led to increased costs from membrane modules and a higher energy demand. Compared to the existing treatment (0.33 €/m3), the operational costs were estimated to increase 6% for ultrafiltration and 30% for nanofiltration. Considering the low emissions from Nordic energy production, the membrane processes would lower the environmental impact, including factors such as climate and ecosystem health. Greenhouse gas emissions would decrease from 161 g CO2-eq/m3 of the existing process, to 127 g CO2-eq/m3 or 83 g CO2-eq/m3 for ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, respectively. Lower chemical consumption and less pollution from the sludge leaving the water treatment plant lead to lower impacts on the environment.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cost analysis, Environmental impact, Nanofiltration, Natural organic matter, Ultrafiltration
in
Water
volume
8
issue
4
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:84965096545
  • wos:000375157200041
ISSN
2073-4441
DOI
10.3390/w8040150
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
cf44e783-afc1-4424-ad21-339659b22db8
date added to LUP
2016-07-04 09:49:26
date last changed
2017-03-05 04:35:07
@article{cf44e783-afc1-4424-ad21-339659b22db8,
  abstract     = {<p>Membrane technology, i.e., ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, is growing in popularity, as it is a space efficient alternative for surface water treatment. Two types of hollow fiber membranes were tested in a fully equipped and automated pilot at a Swedish water treatment plant. Raw water was treated by a nanofilter and by coagulation before an ultrafilter. Operation parameters recorded during these trials have been the basis for cost estimations and assessments of environmental impact, comparing the two membrane modules to the existing conventional treatment. The membranes required lower chemical consumption, but led to increased costs from membrane modules and a higher energy demand. Compared to the existing treatment (0.33 €/m<sup>3</sup>), the operational costs were estimated to increase 6% for ultrafiltration and 30% for nanofiltration. Considering the low emissions from Nordic energy production, the membrane processes would lower the environmental impact, including factors such as climate and ecosystem health. Greenhouse gas emissions would decrease from 161 g CO<sub>2</sub>-eq/m<sup>3</sup> of the existing process, to 127 g CO<sub>2</sub>-eq/m<sup>3</sup> or 83 g CO<sub>2</sub>-eq/m<sup>3</sup> for ultrafiltration and nanofiltration, respectively. Lower chemical consumption and less pollution from the sludge leaving the water treatment plant lead to lower impacts on the environment.</p>},
  articleno    = {150},
  author       = {Lidén, Angelica and Persson, Kenneth M.},
  issn         = {2073-4441},
  keyword      = {Cost analysis,Environmental impact,Nanofiltration,Natural organic matter,Ultrafiltration},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  series       = {Water},
  title        = {Feasibility study of advanced nom-reduction by hollow fiber ultrafiltration and nanofiltration at a Swedish surface water treatment plant},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/w8040150},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2016},
}