Advanced

An interface damage model that captures crack propagation at the microscale in cortical bone using XFEM

Gustafsson, Anna LU ; Khayyeri, Hanifeh LU ; Wallin, Mathias LU and Isaksson, Hanna LU (2019) In Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials 90. p.556-565
Abstract

Reliable tools for fracture risk assessment are necessary to handle the challenge with an aging population and the increasing occurrence of bone fractures. As it is currently difficult to measure local damage parameters experimentally, computational models could be used to provide insight into how cortical bone microstructure and material properties contribute to the fracture resistance. In this study, a model for crack propagation in 2D at the microscale in cortical bone was developed using the extended finite element method (XFEM). By combining the maximum principal strain criterion with an additional interface damage formulation in the cement line, the model could capture crack deflections at the osteon boundaries as observed in... (More)

Reliable tools for fracture risk assessment are necessary to handle the challenge with an aging population and the increasing occurrence of bone fractures. As it is currently difficult to measure local damage parameters experimentally, computational models could be used to provide insight into how cortical bone microstructure and material properties contribute to the fracture resistance. In this study, a model for crack propagation in 2D at the microscale in cortical bone was developed using the extended finite element method (XFEM). By combining the maximum principal strain criterion with an additional interface damage formulation in the cement line, the model could capture crack deflections at the osteon boundaries as observed in experiments. The model was used to analyze how the Haversian canal and the interface strength of the cement line affected the crack trajectory in models depicting osteons with three different orientations in 2D. Weak cement line interfaces were found to reorient the propagating cracks while models with strong interfaces predicted crack trajectories that penetrated the cement line and propagated through the osteons. The presented model is a promising tool that could be used to analyze how local, age-related material changes influence the crack trajectory and fracture resistance in cortical bone.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cement line, Crack deflection, Haversian canal, Microstructure, Osteon
in
Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials
volume
90
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:85056896962
ISSN
1751-6161
DOI
10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.09.045
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d0a47e7a-5141-408b-aa8f-8d8c9e7f33bb
date added to LUP
2018-11-29 10:26:21
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:38:20
@article{d0a47e7a-5141-408b-aa8f-8d8c9e7f33bb,
  abstract     = {<p>Reliable tools for fracture risk assessment are necessary to handle the challenge with an aging population and the increasing occurrence of bone fractures. As it is currently difficult to measure local damage parameters experimentally, computational models could be used to provide insight into how cortical bone microstructure and material properties contribute to the fracture resistance. In this study, a model for crack propagation in 2D at the microscale in cortical bone was developed using the extended finite element method (XFEM). By combining the maximum principal strain criterion with an additional interface damage formulation in the cement line, the model could capture crack deflections at the osteon boundaries as observed in experiments. The model was used to analyze how the Haversian canal and the interface strength of the cement line affected the crack trajectory in models depicting osteons with three different orientations in 2D. Weak cement line interfaces were found to reorient the propagating cracks while models with strong interfaces predicted crack trajectories that penetrated the cement line and propagated through the osteons. The presented model is a promising tool that could be used to analyze how local, age-related material changes influence the crack trajectory and fracture resistance in cortical bone.</p>},
  author       = {Gustafsson, Anna and Khayyeri, Hanifeh and Wallin, Mathias and Isaksson, Hanna},
  issn         = {1751-6161},
  keyword      = {Cement line,Crack deflection,Haversian canal,Microstructure,Osteon},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {556--565},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials},
  title        = {An interface damage model that captures crack propagation at the microscale in cortical bone using XFEM},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2018.09.045},
  volume       = {90},
  year         = {2019},
}