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Greek sculpture as a tool in understanding the phenomenon of movement quality

Skjaerven, Liv H.; Gard, Gunvor LU and Kristoffersen, Kjell (2004) In Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies 8(3). p.227-236
Abstract

Previous research has shown that movement quality may be described as offering a general impression of a whole unified person, understood as a relation between postural stability, free breathing and awareness, which combined produce a refinement of movement as well as enhancing well-being. The phenomenon could further be structured in terms of four movement dimensions: structural, physiological, psychological/relational and a purely human dimension. So far we have little knowledge about these dimensions. The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of the phenomenon of movement quality through close observation of Greek sculpture, reflection and literature studies relating to Greek sculpture. The aim was to see if these methods... (More)

Previous research has shown that movement quality may be described as offering a general impression of a whole unified person, understood as a relation between postural stability, free breathing and awareness, which combined produce a refinement of movement as well as enhancing well-being. The phenomenon could further be structured in terms of four movement dimensions: structural, physiological, psychological/relational and a purely human dimension. So far we have little knowledge about these dimensions. The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of the phenomenon of movement quality through close observation of Greek sculpture, reflection and literature studies relating to Greek sculpture. The aim was to see if these methods could be a tool for achievement of a deeper understanding of movement quality, in clinical observation and reasoning. A phenomenological method was used to study the essence of the phenomenon of movement quality. A study of Greek sculpture was chosen because of the way ancient Greek sculptors sought to express several dimensions of human existence. The results show that close observation, reflection and literature studies of Greek sculptures deepened the knowledge of the four dimensions of movement quality and provided a way in which this knowledge could be expressed in words. These methods may represent a tool for achieving a deeper understanding of movement quality in clinical observation and reasoning.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Awareness, Basic body awareness therapy, Greek sculpture, Movement analysis, Movement observation, Movement quality
in
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
volume
8
issue
3
pages
10 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:3042708418
ISSN
1360-8592
DOI
10.1016/S1360-8592(03)00105-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d0db8745-b033-42b8-99c4-d0a4fdd8eb26
date added to LUP
2016-12-19 14:09:24
date last changed
2017-05-07 04:49:02
@article{d0db8745-b033-42b8-99c4-d0a4fdd8eb26,
  abstract     = {<p>Previous research has shown that movement quality may be described as offering a general impression of a whole unified person, understood as a relation between postural stability, free breathing and awareness, which combined produce a refinement of movement as well as enhancing well-being. The phenomenon could further be structured in terms of four movement dimensions: structural, physiological, psychological/relational and a purely human dimension. So far we have little knowledge about these dimensions. The aim of this study is to deepen the understanding of the phenomenon of movement quality through close observation of Greek sculpture, reflection and literature studies relating to Greek sculpture. The aim was to see if these methods could be a tool for achievement of a deeper understanding of movement quality, in clinical observation and reasoning. A phenomenological method was used to study the essence of the phenomenon of movement quality. A study of Greek sculpture was chosen because of the way ancient Greek sculptors sought to express several dimensions of human existence. The results show that close observation, reflection and literature studies of Greek sculptures deepened the knowledge of the four dimensions of movement quality and provided a way in which this knowledge could be expressed in words. These methods may represent a tool for achieving a deeper understanding of movement quality in clinical observation and reasoning.</p>},
  author       = {Skjaerven, Liv H. and Gard, Gunvor and Kristoffersen, Kjell},
  issn         = {1360-8592},
  keyword      = {Awareness,Basic body awareness therapy,Greek sculpture,Movement analysis,Movement observation,Movement quality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {227--236},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies},
  title        = {Greek sculpture as a tool in understanding the phenomenon of movement quality},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1360-8592(03)00105-0},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2004},
}