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Changes in Plant Rhizosphere Microbial Communities under Different Vegetation Restoration Patterns in Karst and Non-karst Ecosystems

Fan, Zhouzhou ; Lu, Shuyu ; Liu, Shuang ; Guo, Hui ; Wang, Tao LU ; Zhou, Jinxing and Peng, Xiawei (2019) In Scientific Reports 9(1).
Abstract

Understanding how patterns of recovery and geological conditions affect microbial communities is important for determining the stability of karst ecosystems. Here, we investigated the diversity and composition of microorganisms in karst and non-karst environments under natural restoration and artificial rehabilitation conditions. The results showed no significant differences in soil microbial diversity, but the microbial communities associated with geological conditions and tree species differed significantly. Variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that a total of 77.3% of the variation in bacteria and a total of 69.3% of the variation in fungi could be explained by vegetation type and geological background. There were significant... (More)

Understanding how patterns of recovery and geological conditions affect microbial communities is important for determining the stability of karst ecosystems. Here, we investigated the diversity and composition of microorganisms in karst and non-karst environments under natural restoration and artificial rehabilitation conditions. The results showed no significant differences in soil microbial diversity, but the microbial communities associated with geological conditions and tree species differed significantly. Variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that a total of 77.3% of the variation in bacteria and a total of 69.3% of the variation in fungi could be explained by vegetation type and geological background. There were significant differences in six bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Ktedonobacteria, TK10, Gammaproteobacteria, and Anaerolineae) and nine fungal classes (Eurotiomycetes, Agaricomycetes, unclassified _p_Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes, Tremellomycetes, norank_k_Fungi, Pezizomycetes, Leotiomycetes and Archaeorhizomycetes) among the soils collected from six plots. A Spearman correlation heatmap showed that the microbial community was affected by the major soil properties. Principal coordinates analysis indicated that the microbial community of Pinus yunnanensis in the artificial forest, which was established for the protection of the environment was most similar to that in the natural secondary forest in the karst ecosystem. These findings further our understanding of microbial responses to vegetation restoration and geological conditions.

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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scientific Reports
volume
9
issue
1
article number
8761
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:85067648253
  • pmid:31217455
ISSN
2045-2322
DOI
10.1038/s41598-019-44985-8
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d1863c0c-1959-487a-ab52-8165ebd48360
date added to LUP
2019-07-03 14:20:33
date last changed
2020-01-13 02:11:23
@article{d1863c0c-1959-487a-ab52-8165ebd48360,
  abstract     = {<p>Understanding how patterns of recovery and geological conditions affect microbial communities is important for determining the stability of karst ecosystems. Here, we investigated the diversity and composition of microorganisms in karst and non-karst environments under natural restoration and artificial rehabilitation conditions. The results showed no significant differences in soil microbial diversity, but the microbial communities associated with geological conditions and tree species differed significantly. Variation partitioning analysis (VPA) showed that a total of 77.3% of the variation in bacteria and a total of 69.3% of the variation in fungi could be explained by vegetation type and geological background. There were significant differences in six bacterial classes (Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Ktedonobacteria, TK10, Gammaproteobacteria, and Anaerolineae) and nine fungal classes (Eurotiomycetes, Agaricomycetes, unclassified _p_Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes, Tremellomycetes, norank_k_Fungi, Pezizomycetes, Leotiomycetes and Archaeorhizomycetes) among the soils collected from six plots. A Spearman correlation heatmap showed that the microbial community was affected by the major soil properties. Principal coordinates analysis indicated that the microbial community of Pinus yunnanensis in the artificial forest, which was established for the protection of the environment was most similar to that in the natural secondary forest in the karst ecosystem. These findings further our understanding of microbial responses to vegetation restoration and geological conditions.</p>},
  author       = {Fan, Zhouzhou and Lu, Shuyu and Liu, Shuang and Guo, Hui and Wang, Tao and Zhou, Jinxing and Peng, Xiawei},
  issn         = {2045-2322},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Scientific Reports},
  title        = {Changes in Plant Rhizosphere Microbial Communities under Different Vegetation Restoration Patterns in Karst and Non-karst Ecosystems},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-44985-8},
  doi          = {10.1038/s41598-019-44985-8},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2019},
}