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Use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics is associated with falls in nursing home residents : a longitudinal cohort study

Westerlind, Björn; Östgren, Carl Johan; Mölstad, Sigvard LU ; Midlöv, Patrik LU and Hägg, Staffan (2018) In Aging clinical and experimental research
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Falls and related injuries are common among older people, and several drug classes are considered to increase fall risk.

AIMS: This study aimed to investigate the association between the use of certain drug classes and falls in older nursing home residents in Sweden, and relate these to different age groups.

METHODS: Information on falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of possible fall risk drugs including non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (zopiclone and zolpidem) was collected from 331 nursing home residents during 2008-2011. Over the following 6 months, the occurrence of serious falls, requiring a physician visit or hospital care, was registered. Association between serious falls and drug use was... (More)

BACKGROUND: Falls and related injuries are common among older people, and several drug classes are considered to increase fall risk.

AIMS: This study aimed to investigate the association between the use of certain drug classes and falls in older nursing home residents in Sweden, and relate these to different age groups.

METHODS: Information on falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of possible fall risk drugs including non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (zopiclone and zolpidem) was collected from 331 nursing home residents during 2008-2011. Over the following 6 months, the occurrence of serious falls, requiring a physician visit or hospital care, was registered. Association between serious falls and drug use was compared between an older (≥ 85 years) and a younger group.

RESULTS: An increased fall risk (Downton Fall Risk Index ≥ 3) was found in 93% of the study subjects (aged 65-101 years). Baseline data indicated an association between falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (p = 0.005), but not with the other studied drug classes. During the following 6 months, an association between use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and serious falls in the older group (p = 0.017, odds ratio 4.311) was found. No association was found between the other studied drug classes and serious falls.

DISCUSSION: These results indicate an association between falls and the use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, compounds that previously have been considered generally well-tolerated in older people.

CONCLUSIONS: Caution is advocated when using non-benzodiazepine hypnotics regularly in older people living in nursing homes.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
in
Aging clinical and experimental research
pages
9 pages
publisher
Kurtis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85055751099
ISSN
1720-8319
DOI
10.1007/s40520-018-1056-0
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d1d13cf9-08e7-4052-93fa-02c31ebcec74
date added to LUP
2018-10-27 12:24:56
date last changed
2018-11-25 04:25:56
@article{d1d13cf9-08e7-4052-93fa-02c31ebcec74,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Falls and related injuries are common among older people, and several drug classes are considered to increase fall risk.</p><p>AIMS: This study aimed to investigate the association between the use of certain drug classes and falls in older nursing home residents in Sweden, and relate these to different age groups.</p><p>METHODS: Information on falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of possible fall risk drugs including non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (zopiclone and zolpidem) was collected from 331 nursing home residents during 2008-2011. Over the following 6 months, the occurrence of serious falls, requiring a physician visit or hospital care, was registered. Association between serious falls and drug use was compared between an older (≥ 85 years) and a younger group.</p><p>RESULTS: An increased fall risk (Downton Fall Risk Index ≥ 3) was found in 93% of the study subjects (aged 65-101 years). Baseline data indicated an association between falls that occurred in the previous year and regular use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics (p = 0.005), but not with the other studied drug classes. During the following 6 months, an association between use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics and serious falls in the older group (p = 0.017, odds ratio 4.311) was found. No association was found between the other studied drug classes and serious falls.</p><p>DISCUSSION: These results indicate an association between falls and the use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics, compounds that previously have been considered generally well-tolerated in older people.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Caution is advocated when using non-benzodiazepine hypnotics regularly in older people living in nursing homes.</p>},
  author       = {Westerlind, Björn and Östgren, Carl Johan and Mölstad, Sigvard and Midlöv, Patrik and Hägg, Staffan},
  issn         = {1720-8319},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  pages        = {9},
  publisher    = {Kurtis},
  series       = {Aging clinical and experimental research},
  title        = {Use of non-benzodiazepine hypnotics is associated with falls in nursing home residents : a longitudinal cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40520-018-1056-0},
  year         = {2018},
}