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How to decarbonise energy-intensive processing industries? : Survey and conceptualisation of their specific innovation systems

Wesseling, Joeri LU ; Lechtenböhmer, Stefan LU ; Åhman, Max LU ; Nilsson, Lars J LU ; Worell, Ernst and Coenen, Lars (2016) In Proceeding ECEEE Industrial Efficiency p.1-16
Abstract (Swedish)
Energy-intensive processing industries (EPIs) such as iron and steel, aluminum, chemicals, cement, glass, and paper and pulp are responsible for a large share of global greenhouse gas emissions. To meet 2050 emission targets, a transition to low carbon, often radical innovations is required, but this process is going slow. Insights from sociotechnical and innovation systems perspectives are therefore needed to facilitate and steer this transition process. The transitions literature has so far however, neglected EPIs.
This paper characterises the sociotechnical and innovation systems of EPIs in terms of stylized facts, identifying similarities and differences between the individual industries. These stylized facts are recognized through... (More)
Energy-intensive processing industries (EPIs) such as iron and steel, aluminum, chemicals, cement, glass, and paper and pulp are responsible for a large share of global greenhouse gas emissions. To meet 2050 emission targets, a transition to low carbon, often radical innovations is required, but this process is going slow. Insights from sociotechnical and innovation systems perspectives are therefore needed to facilitate and steer this transition process. The transitions literature has so far however, neglected EPIs.
This paper characterises the sociotechnical and innovation systems of EPIs in terms of stylized facts, identifying similarities and differences between the individual industries. These stylized facts are recognized through an iterative process that builds on the authors’ expertise on EPIs and a review of available literature and documentation. Building on the limited body of available literature, it subsequently explores how these stylized facts may influence low carbon transition processes and identifies literature gaps from which a first agenda to further transitions research on EPIs is sketched. Insights obtained through such research would not only benefit policy recommendations, but may also lead to theoretical enrichment, as the unique EPI characteristics are likely to result in for example new transition dynamics or lock-in mechanisms. The paper is concluded with some implications for policy. (Less)
Abstract
Energy-intensive processing industries (EPIs) such as iron and steel, aluminum, chemicals, cement, glass, and paper and pulp are responsible for a large share of global greenhouse gas emissions. To meet 2050 emission targets, a transition to low carbon, often radical innovations is required, but this process is going slow. Insights from sociotechnical and innovation systems perspectives are therefore needed to facilitate and steer this transition process. The transitions literature has so far however, neglected EPIs.
This paper characterises the sociotechnical and innovation systems of EPIs in terms of stylized facts, identifying similarities and differences between the individual industries. These stylized facts are recognized through... (More)
Energy-intensive processing industries (EPIs) such as iron and steel, aluminum, chemicals, cement, glass, and paper and pulp are responsible for a large share of global greenhouse gas emissions. To meet 2050 emission targets, a transition to low carbon, often radical innovations is required, but this process is going slow. Insights from sociotechnical and innovation systems perspectives are therefore needed to facilitate and steer this transition process. The transitions literature has so far however, neglected EPIs.
This paper characterises the sociotechnical and innovation systems of EPIs in terms of stylized facts, identifying similarities and differences between the individual industries. These stylized facts are recognized through an
iterative process that builds on the authors’ expertise on EPIs and a review of available literature and documentation. Building on the limited body of available literature, it subsequently explores how these stylized facts may influence low carbon transition processes and identifies literature gaps from which a first agenda to further transitions research on EPIs is sketched. Insights obtained through such research would not only benefit policy recommendations, but may also lead to theoretical enrichment, as the unique EPI characteristics are likely
to result in for example new transition dynamics or lock-in mechanisms. The paper is concluded with some implications for policy. (Less)
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alternative title
How to decarbonise energy-intensive processing industries? : Survey and conceptualisation of their specific innovation systems
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type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
in
Proceeding ECEEE Industrial Efficiency
pages
16 pages
publisher
ECEEE
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d240b097-b14a-4b57-a565-85956f302aae
date added to LUP
2016-08-12 11:32:43
date last changed
2016-11-14 11:58:13
@inproceedings{d240b097-b14a-4b57-a565-85956f302aae,
  abstract     = {Energy-intensive processing industries (EPIs) such as iron and steel, aluminum, chemicals, cement, glass, and paper and pulp are responsible for a large share of global greenhouse gas emissions. To meet 2050 emission targets, a transition to low carbon, often radical innovations is required, but this process is going slow. Insights from sociotechnical and innovation systems perspectives are therefore needed to facilitate and steer this transition process. The transitions literature has so far however, neglected EPIs.<br/>This paper characterises the sociotechnical and innovation systems of EPIs in terms of stylized facts, identifying similarities and differences between the individual industries. These stylized facts are recognized through an<br/>iterative process that builds on the authors’ expertise on EPIs and a review of available literature and documentation. Building on the limited body of available literature, it subsequently explores how these stylized facts may influence low carbon transition processes and identifies literature gaps from which a first agenda to further transitions research on EPIs is sketched. Insights obtained through such research would not only benefit policy recommendations, but may also lead to theoretical enrichment, as the unique EPI characteristics are likely<br/>to result in for example new transition dynamics or lock-in mechanisms. The paper is concluded with some implications for policy.},
  author       = {Wesseling, Joeri and Lechtenböhmer, Stefan and Åhman, Max and Nilsson, Lars J and Worell, Ernst and Coenen, Lars},
  booktitle    = {Proceeding ECEEE Industrial Efficiency},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  pages        = {1--16},
  publisher    = {ECEEE},
  title        = {How to decarbonise energy-intensive processing industries? : Survey and conceptualisation of their specific innovation systems},
  year         = {2016},
}