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Biological processes for hydrogen production

van Niel, Ed LU (2016) In Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology Series p.1-39
Abstract
Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and... (More)
Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
biohydrogen, photosynthetic hydrogen production, photofermentation, dark fermentation, electrohydrogenesis, hydrogen productivities
in
Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology Series
pages
39 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:84997229071
  • wos:000395374400008
ISBN
978-3-319-45651-5
DOI
10.1007/10_2016_11
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d336ad31-6da9-4f7e-8f7f-cdb7f6ce4691
date added to LUP
2016-09-16 13:23:20
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:29:31
@inbook{d336ad31-6da9-4f7e-8f7f-cdb7f6ce4691,
  abstract     = {Methane is produced usually from organic waste in a straightforward anaerobic digestion process. However, hydrogen production is technically more challenging as more stages are needed to convert all biomass to hydrogen because of thermodynamic constraints. Nevertheless, the benefit of hydrogen is that it can be produced, both biologically and thermochemically, in more than one way from either organic compounds or water. Research in biological hydrogen production is booming, as reflected by the myriad of recently published reviews on the topic. This overview is written from the perspective of how to transfer as much energy as possible from the feedstock into the gaseous products hydrogen, and to a lesser extent, methane. The status and remaining challenges of all the biological processes are concisely discussed.},
  author       = {van Niel, Ed},
  isbn         = {978-3-319-45651-5},
  keyword      = {biohydrogen,photosynthetic hydrogen production,photofermentation,dark fermentation,electrohydrogenesis,hydrogen productivities},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--39},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Advances in Biochemical Engineering/Biotechnology Series},
  title        = {Biological processes for hydrogen production},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/10_2016_11},
  year         = {2016},
}