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Ethnography of the socio-sanitary reception in Rome. How are HIV/AIDS and hepatitis b involved in creating the construction of legal categories assigned to migrants?

Santilli, Cecilia LU (2021) In International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
Abstract

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the role that Italian third sector organizations have in the process of social and administrative categorization of newly arrived migrants living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids) or hepatitis b. In Italy, free access to health is provided to all migrants and residence permits for medical treatment is granted for migrants living with a “serious illness” since the 1990s. The case of HIV/Aids and hepatitis b shows how this political openness, however, clashes with the tightening of migration policies. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on ethnographic research conducted between 2014 and 2016 within an associative centre that deals with the... (More)

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the role that Italian third sector organizations have in the process of social and administrative categorization of newly arrived migrants living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids) or hepatitis b. In Italy, free access to health is provided to all migrants and residence permits for medical treatment is granted for migrants living with a “serious illness” since the 1990s. The case of HIV/Aids and hepatitis b shows how this political openness, however, clashes with the tightening of migration policies. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on ethnographic research conducted between 2014 and 2016 within an associative centre that deals with the socio-health care of newly arrived migrants in Rome. In addition to the participant observations, the study is based in semi-structured interviews conducted with 10 health-care providers (nurses, health-care assistants and socio-cultural mediators) and doctors and with 22 migrants coming from Sub-Saharan Africa and living with HIV/AIDS (10) and hepatitis b (12). Findings: In Italy, the two infections have been identified as top diseases among migrant populations in the country but if HIV/Aids is always considered as a “serious illness”, hepatitis b is considered as a public health priority only in the case of a treatment prescription. These aspects have an important impact on the interactions between medical and social professionals and migrants affected by HIV/AIDS and hepatitis b, contributing differently to the creation of legal categories assigned to migrants. Originality/value: The case of HIV/Aids and hepatitis b shows how the political openness of the public health system, clashes with the tightening of migration policies and analyse the role of the third sector has in this issue.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Access to health care, Civil society, Hepatitis b, HIV, Italy, Migrants, Third sector
in
International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:85102209591
ISSN
1747-9894
DOI
10.1108/IJMHSC-07-2019-0061
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d3a3a554-0a57-4748-978d-9aa6a983b1f3
date added to LUP
2021-03-18 10:41:33
date last changed
2021-03-18 10:41:33
@article{d3a3a554-0a57-4748-978d-9aa6a983b1f3,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the role that Italian third sector organizations have in the process of social and administrative categorization of newly arrived migrants living with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/Aids) or hepatitis b. In Italy, free access to health is provided to all migrants and residence permits for medical treatment is granted for migrants living with a “serious illness” since the 1990s. The case of HIV/Aids and hepatitis b shows how this political openness, however, clashes with the tightening of migration policies. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on ethnographic research conducted between 2014 and 2016 within an associative centre that deals with the socio-health care of newly arrived migrants in Rome. In addition to the participant observations, the study is based in semi-structured interviews conducted with 10 health-care providers (nurses, health-care assistants and socio-cultural mediators) and doctors and with 22 migrants coming from Sub-Saharan Africa and living with HIV/AIDS (10) and hepatitis b (12). Findings: In Italy, the two infections have been identified as top diseases among migrant populations in the country but if HIV/Aids is always considered as a “serious illness”, hepatitis b is considered as a public health priority only in the case of a treatment prescription. These aspects have an important impact on the interactions between medical and social professionals and migrants affected by HIV/AIDS and hepatitis b, contributing differently to the creation of legal categories assigned to migrants. Originality/value: The case of HIV/Aids and hepatitis b shows how the political openness of the public health system, clashes with the tightening of migration policies and analyse the role of the third sector has in this issue.</p>},
  author       = {Santilli, Cecilia},
  issn         = {1747-9894},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care},
  title        = {Ethnography of the socio-sanitary reception in Rome. How are HIV/AIDS and hepatitis b involved in creating the construction of legal categories assigned to migrants?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJMHSC-07-2019-0061},
  doi          = {10.1108/IJMHSC-07-2019-0061},
  year         = {2021},
}