Advanced

The association between smoking and knee osteoarthritis in a cohort of Danish patients undergoing knee arthroscopy

Johnsen, Marianne Bakke; Pihl, Kenneth; Nissen, Nis; Sørensen, Rasmus Reinholdt; Jørgensen, Uffe; Englund, Martin LU and Thorlund, Jonas Bloch (2019) In BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders 20(1).
Abstract

Background: It has been suggested that smoking is associated with reduced risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, supplementary studies are needed to further investigate any such potential association. Thus, our aim was to examine the relationship between smoking and early or more established knee OA in a cohort of relatively young patients with meniscal tears. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 620 participants from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing knee arthroscopy for a meniscal tear (mean age 49.2 (18.0-76.8) years). Recruitment of patients was performed between February 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015, at four different hospitals in Denmark. We defined early or more established knee OA as the... (More)

Background: It has been suggested that smoking is associated with reduced risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, supplementary studies are needed to further investigate any such potential association. Thus, our aim was to examine the relationship between smoking and early or more established knee OA in a cohort of relatively young patients with meniscal tears. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 620 participants from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing knee arthroscopy for a meniscal tear (mean age 49.2 (18.0-76.8) years). Recruitment of patients was performed between February 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015, at four different hospitals in Denmark. We defined early or more established knee OA as the combination of patient-reported frequent knee pain, degenerative meniscal tissue and presence of cartilage defects assessed by the operating surgeons. The relationship between smoking status and knee OA was examined by risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI), estimated from logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, BMI, education, work status and level of physical activity. Results: The prevalence of early or more established knee OA was 37.7% in current smokers and 45.0% in non-smokers. We found no statistically significant association between current smoking and knee OA (adjusted RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.91-1.30). Conclusions: This study found no relationship between current smoking and early or more established knee OA in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Thus, the inverse association between smoking and knee OA that has been suggested by previous studies was not confirmed.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Knee arthroscopy, Knee osteoarthritis, Meniscal tear, Risk factor, Smoking
in
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
volume
20
issue
1
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:85063814997
ISSN
1471-2474
DOI
10.1186/s12891-019-2518-z
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d5b47409-6cf8-4260-affe-c2ff8edaee93
date added to LUP
2019-04-23 13:15:01
date last changed
2019-05-14 04:53:58
@article{d5b47409-6cf8-4260-affe-c2ff8edaee93,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: It has been suggested that smoking is associated with reduced risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, supplementary studies are needed to further investigate any such potential association. Thus, our aim was to examine the relationship between smoking and early or more established knee OA in a cohort of relatively young patients with meniscal tears. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 620 participants from the Knee Arthroscopy Cohort Southern Denmark (KACS) undergoing knee arthroscopy for a meniscal tear (mean age 49.2 (18.0-76.8) years). Recruitment of patients was performed between February 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015, at four different hospitals in Denmark. We defined early or more established knee OA as the combination of patient-reported frequent knee pain, degenerative meniscal tissue and presence of cartilage defects assessed by the operating surgeons. The relationship between smoking status and knee OA was examined by risk ratio (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI), estimated from logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, BMI, education, work status and level of physical activity. Results: The prevalence of early or more established knee OA was 37.7% in current smokers and 45.0% in non-smokers. We found no statistically significant association between current smoking and knee OA (adjusted RR 1.09, 95% CI 0.91-1.30). Conclusions: This study found no relationship between current smoking and early or more established knee OA in a cohort of patients undergoing arthroscopic meniscal surgery. Thus, the inverse association between smoking and knee OA that has been suggested by previous studies was not confirmed.</p>},
  articleno    = {141},
  author       = {Johnsen, Marianne Bakke and Pihl, Kenneth and Nissen, Nis and Sørensen, Rasmus Reinholdt and Jørgensen, Uffe and Englund, Martin and Thorlund, Jonas Bloch},
  issn         = {1471-2474},
  keyword      = {Knee arthroscopy,Knee osteoarthritis,Meniscal tear,Risk factor,Smoking},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders},
  title        = {The association between smoking and knee osteoarthritis in a cohort of Danish patients undergoing knee arthroscopy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12891-019-2518-z},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2019},
}