Advanced

Labour force building in a rapidly expanding sector

Martynovich, Mikhail LU and Henning, Martin LU (2017) In Industry and Innovation
Abstract

Between 1991 and 2010, jobs in the knowledge-intensive IT services sector in Sweden increased from 30,000 to 104,000. Departing from recent theoretical insights suggesting that the skill composition of worker inflows is an indicator of knowledge relevant to employers, we investigate labour inflows into the sector. Who were the people getting jobs in this expanding sector? And, how were their skills valued by employers as the sector evolved? Our findings suggest that sectoral evolution was not reflected in how the skills of incoming workers were valued, but rather in who was hired into the sector. The paper suggests that the analysis of worker inflows is a tool for investigating the evolution of both sectors and their knowledge bases. It... (More)

Between 1991 and 2010, jobs in the knowledge-intensive IT services sector in Sweden increased from 30,000 to 104,000. Departing from recent theoretical insights suggesting that the skill composition of worker inflows is an indicator of knowledge relevant to employers, we investigate labour inflows into the sector. Who were the people getting jobs in this expanding sector? And, how were their skills valued by employers as the sector evolved? Our findings suggest that sectoral evolution was not reflected in how the skills of incoming workers were valued, but rather in who was hired into the sector. The paper suggests that the analysis of worker inflows is a tool for investigating the evolution of both sectors and their knowledge bases. It provides some lessons for industrial and educational policies regarding technologically turbulent industries, and takes the first step towards developing an approach that integrates industry dynamics with labour force sourcing and evolution.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
evolution, human capital, Industry dynamics, labour mobility, labour sourcing
in
Industry and Innovation
pages
29 pages
publisher
Routledge
external identifiers
  • scopus:85012306115
  • wos:000417783000004
ISSN
1366-2716
DOI
10.1080/13662716.2017.1291330
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d69f9b6a-2493-4ec8-8ef5-aacfee9ac111
date added to LUP
2017-02-22 13:23:11
date last changed
2018-06-10 05:16:17
@article{d69f9b6a-2493-4ec8-8ef5-aacfee9ac111,
  abstract     = {<p>Between 1991 and 2010, jobs in the knowledge-intensive IT services sector in Sweden increased from 30,000 to 104,000. Departing from recent theoretical insights suggesting that the skill composition of worker inflows is an indicator of knowledge relevant to employers, we investigate labour inflows into the sector. Who were the people getting jobs in this expanding sector? And, how were their skills valued by employers as the sector evolved? Our findings suggest that sectoral evolution was not reflected in how the skills of incoming workers were valued, but rather in who was hired into the sector. The paper suggests that the analysis of worker inflows is a tool for investigating the evolution of both sectors and their knowledge bases. It provides some lessons for industrial and educational policies regarding technologically turbulent industries, and takes the first step towards developing an approach that integrates industry dynamics with labour force sourcing and evolution.</p>},
  author       = {Martynovich, Mikhail and Henning, Martin},
  issn         = {1366-2716},
  keyword      = {evolution,human capital,Industry dynamics,labour mobility,labour sourcing},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  pages        = {29},
  publisher    = {Routledge},
  series       = {Industry and Innovation},
  title        = {Labour force building in a rapidly expanding sector},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13662716.2017.1291330},
  year         = {2017},
}