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Non-adherence to immunosuppressants after lung transplantation- a common risk behavior

Lennerling, Annette ; Kisch, Annika LU and Forsberg, Anna LU (2019) In The Open Nursing Journal
Abstract

Background:

After lung transplantation, life-long treatment with immunosuppressive medication is required to prevent rejection and graft loss but adherence to immunosuppressive treatment may be difficult for the lung recipient. Adherence is essential and non-adherence to immunosuppressive treatment can lead to graft loss and death.
Objective:

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of non-adherence 1 to 5 years after lung transplantation in relation to symptom burden, health literacy, psychological well-being and relevant demographic variables.
Methods:

117 adult lung recipients, due for their annual follow-up 1-5 years after lung transplantation, participated. Four... (More)

Background:

After lung transplantation, life-long treatment with immunosuppressive medication is required to prevent rejection and graft loss but adherence to immunosuppressive treatment may be difficult for the lung recipient. Adherence is essential and non-adherence to immunosuppressive treatment can lead to graft loss and death.
Objective:

The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of non-adherence 1 to 5 years after lung transplantation in relation to symptom burden, health literacy, psychological well-being and relevant demographic variables.
Methods:

117 adult lung recipients, due for their annual follow-up 1-5 years after lung transplantation, participated. Four self-report instruments were used for assessment: the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale, the Newest Vital Sign, the Psychological General Well-Being and the Organ Transplant Symptom and Wellbeing Instrument. Statistical analysis was performed.
Results:

Thirty percent of the lung recipients were non-adherent. The most common non-adherence dimension was not taking a dose (43%) and not being punctual with the regimen (80%). Of those working full time or part time, 43% were non-adherent (p=.032). A higher level of non-adherence was reported a long time after LuTx with the highest level at the 3-year follow-up.
Conclusion:

The level of non-adherence among lung recipients was high. The highest levels were found among those who had returned to work. Non-adherence increased with time after lung transplantation.
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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
The Open Nursing Journal
issue
58
external identifiers
  • scopus:85067106886
DOI
10.2174/1874434601913010108
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d6c7521e-2aa1-4007-b582-b8ad14c3293e
date added to LUP
2019-05-30 22:23:55
date last changed
2019-07-16 04:10:40
@article{d6c7521e-2aa1-4007-b582-b8ad14c3293e,
  abstract     = {<br/>Background:<br/><br/>After lung transplantation, life-long treatment with immunosuppressive medication is required to prevent rejection and graft loss but adherence to immunosuppressive treatment may be difficult for the lung recipient. Adherence is essential and non-adherence to immunosuppressive treatment can lead to graft loss and death.<br/>Objective:<br/><br/>The aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of non-adherence 1 to 5 years after lung transplantation in relation to symptom burden, health literacy, psychological well-being and relevant demographic variables.<br/>Methods:<br/><br/>117 adult lung recipients, due for their annual follow-up 1-5 years after lung transplantation, participated. Four self-report instruments were used for assessment: the Basel Assessment of Adherence with Immunosuppressive Medication Scale, the Newest Vital Sign, the Psychological General Well-Being and the Organ Transplant Symptom and Wellbeing Instrument. Statistical analysis was performed.<br/>Results:<br/><br/>Thirty percent of the lung recipients were non-adherent. The most common non-adherence dimension was not taking a dose (43%) and not being punctual with the regimen (80%). Of those working full time or part time, 43% were non-adherent (p=.032). A higher level of non-adherence was reported a long time after LuTx with the highest level at the 3-year follow-up.<br/>Conclusion:<br/><br/>The level of non-adherence among lung recipients was high. The highest levels were found among those who had returned to work. Non-adherence increased with time after lung transplantation.<br/>},
  author       = {Lennerling, Annette and Kisch, Annika and Forsberg, Anna},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {58},
  series       = {The Open Nursing Journal},
  title        = {Non-adherence to immunosuppressants after lung transplantation- a common risk behavior},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1874434601913010108},
  doi          = {10.2174/1874434601913010108},
  year         = {2019},
}