Advanced

Linking ecological debt and ecologically unequal exchange: stocks, flows, and carbon sink appropriation

Warlenius, Rikard LU (2016) In Journal of Political Ecology 23(1). p.364-380
Abstract
Ecological debt is usually conceptualized as the accumulated result of different kinds of uneven flows of natural resources and waste, but these flows are seldom referred to as ecologically unequal exchange. Ecologically unequal exchange, on the other hand, is usually defined as different flows of resources and waste, but the accumulated results of these flows are seldom referred to as ecological debt. In this article, influential definitions and conceptualizations of ecological debt and ecologically unequal exchange are compared and the notions linked together analytically with a stock-flow perspective. A particular challenge is presented by emissions of substances that have global consequences, most importantly carbon dioxide and other... (More)
Ecological debt is usually conceptualized as the accumulated result of different kinds of uneven flows of natural resources and waste, but these flows are seldom referred to as ecologically unequal exchange. Ecologically unequal exchange, on the other hand, is usually defined as different flows of resources and waste, but the accumulated results of these flows are seldom referred to as ecological debt. In this article, influential definitions and conceptualizations of ecological debt and ecologically unequal exchange are compared and the notions linked together analytically with a stock-flow perspective. A particular challenge is presented by emissions of substances that have global consequences, most importantly carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. They form part of ecologically unequal exchange, but what is unequal is not the exchange of resources or energy, but the appropriation of the sinks that absorb these substances. New concepts, unequal sink appropriation and the more specific carbon sink appropriation are proposed as a way of highlighting this distinction. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Political Ecology
volume
23
issue
1
pages
364 - 380
publisher
University of Arizona
external identifiers
  • scopus:85011968934
ISSN
1073-0451
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d7fddb21-15a5-4bb9-b297-b99f6bcc035c
alternative location
http://jpe.library.arizona.edu/volume_23/Warlenius.pdf
date added to LUP
2016-10-25 22:02:12
date last changed
2017-02-26 04:42:04
@article{d7fddb21-15a5-4bb9-b297-b99f6bcc035c,
  abstract     = {Ecological debt is usually conceptualized as the accumulated result of different kinds of uneven flows of natural resources and waste, but these flows are seldom referred to as ecologically unequal exchange. Ecologically unequal exchange, on the other hand, is usually defined as different flows of resources and waste, but the accumulated results of these flows are seldom referred to as ecological debt. In this article, influential definitions and conceptualizations of ecological debt and ecologically unequal exchange are compared and the notions linked together analytically with a stock-flow perspective. A particular challenge is presented by emissions of substances that have global consequences, most importantly carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. They form part of ecologically unequal exchange, but what is unequal is not the exchange of resources or energy, but the appropriation of the sinks that absorb these substances. New concepts, unequal sink appropriation and the more specific carbon sink appropriation are proposed as a way of highlighting this distinction.},
  author       = {Warlenius, Rikard},
  issn         = {1073-0451},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {364--380},
  publisher    = {University of Arizona},
  series       = {Journal of Political Ecology},
  title        = {Linking ecological debt and ecologically unequal exchange: stocks, flows, and carbon sink appropriation},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2016},
}