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Soil organic phosphorus transformations in a boreal forest chronosequence

Vincent, Andrea G.; Vestergren, Johan; Grobner, Gerhard; Persson, Per LU ; Schleucher, Jurgen and Giesler, Reiner (2013) In Plant and Soil 367(1-2). p.149-162
Abstract
Soil phosphorus (P) composition changes with ecosystem development, leading to changes in P bioavailability and ecosystem properties. Little is known, however, about how soil P transformations proceed with ecosystem development in boreal regions. We used 1-dimensional P-31 and 2-dimensional H-1, P-31 correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterise soil organic P transformations in humus horizons across a 7,800 year-old chronosequence in Vasterbotten, northern Sweden. Total soil P concentration varied little along the chronosequence, but P compounds followed three trends. Firstly, the concentrations of DNA, 2-aminoethyl phosphonic acid, and polyphosphate, increased up to 1,200-2,700 years and then declined.... (More)
Soil phosphorus (P) composition changes with ecosystem development, leading to changes in P bioavailability and ecosystem properties. Little is known, however, about how soil P transformations proceed with ecosystem development in boreal regions. We used 1-dimensional P-31 and 2-dimensional H-1, P-31 correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterise soil organic P transformations in humus horizons across a 7,800 year-old chronosequence in Vasterbotten, northern Sweden. Total soil P concentration varied little along the chronosequence, but P compounds followed three trends. Firstly, the concentrations of DNA, 2-aminoethyl phosphonic acid, and polyphosphate, increased up to 1,200-2,700 years and then declined. Secondly, the abundances of alpha- and beta-glycerophosphate, nucleotides, and pyrophosphate, were higher at the youngest site compared with all other sites. Lastly, concentrations of inositol hexakisphosphate fluctuated with site age. The largest changes in soil P composition tended to occur in young sites which also experience the largest shifts in plant community composition. The apparent lack of change in total soil P is consistent with the youth and nitrogen limited nature of the Vasterbotten chronosequence. Based on 2D NMR spectra, around 40 % of extractable soil organic P appeared to occur in live microbial cells. The observed trends in soil organic P may be related to shifts in plant community composition (and associated changes in soil microorganisms) along the studied chronosequence, but further studies are needed to confirm this. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hexakisphosphate, Inositol, P-31 correlation NMR, 2D H-1, Podzolization, 1D (PNMR)-P-31, Ribonucleic acid (RNA), Vasterbotten chronosequence
in
Plant and Soil
volume
367
issue
1-2
pages
149 - 162
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000319771700010
  • scopus:84878527829
ISSN
0032-079X
DOI
10.1007/s11104-013-1731-z
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
da4208d1-79e5-484b-b1ae-61c9424b1216 (old id 3927231)
date added to LUP
2013-07-16 15:32:38
date last changed
2019-07-09 02:40:58
@article{da4208d1-79e5-484b-b1ae-61c9424b1216,
  abstract     = {Soil phosphorus (P) composition changes with ecosystem development, leading to changes in P bioavailability and ecosystem properties. Little is known, however, about how soil P transformations proceed with ecosystem development in boreal regions. We used 1-dimensional P-31 and 2-dimensional H-1, P-31 correlation nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to characterise soil organic P transformations in humus horizons across a 7,800 year-old chronosequence in Vasterbotten, northern Sweden. Total soil P concentration varied little along the chronosequence, but P compounds followed three trends. Firstly, the concentrations of DNA, 2-aminoethyl phosphonic acid, and polyphosphate, increased up to 1,200-2,700 years and then declined. Secondly, the abundances of alpha- and beta-glycerophosphate, nucleotides, and pyrophosphate, were higher at the youngest site compared with all other sites. Lastly, concentrations of inositol hexakisphosphate fluctuated with site age. The largest changes in soil P composition tended to occur in young sites which also experience the largest shifts in plant community composition. The apparent lack of change in total soil P is consistent with the youth and nitrogen limited nature of the Vasterbotten chronosequence. Based on 2D NMR spectra, around 40 % of extractable soil organic P appeared to occur in live microbial cells. The observed trends in soil organic P may be related to shifts in plant community composition (and associated changes in soil microorganisms) along the studied chronosequence, but further studies are needed to confirm this.},
  author       = {Vincent, Andrea G. and Vestergren, Johan and Grobner, Gerhard and Persson, Per and Schleucher, Jurgen and Giesler, Reiner},
  issn         = {0032-079X},
  keyword      = {hexakisphosphate,Inositol,P-31 correlation NMR,2D H-1,Podzolization,1D (PNMR)-P-31,Ribonucleic acid (RNA),Vasterbotten chronosequence},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {149--162},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Plant and Soil},
  title        = {Soil organic phosphorus transformations in a boreal forest chronosequence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11104-013-1731-z},
  volume       = {367},
  year         = {2013},
}