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Malaria infection and feather growth rate predict reproductive success in house martins

Marzal, Alfonso LU ; Reviriego, Maribel; Hermosell, Ignacio G.; Balbontin, Javier; Bensch, Staffan LU ; Relinque, Carmen; Rodriguez, Laura; Garcia-Longoria, Luz and de Lope, Florentino (2013) In Oecologia 171(4). p.853-861
Abstract
Carry-over effects take place when events occurring in one season influence individual performance in a subsequent season. Blood parasites (e.g. Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) have strong negative effects on the body condition of their hosts and could slow the rate of feather growth on the wintering grounds. In turn, these winter moult costs could reduce reproductive success in the following breeding season. In house martins Delichon urbica captured and studied at a breeding site in Europe, we used ptilochronology to measure growth rate of tail feathers moulted on the winter range in Africa, and assessed infection status of blood parasites transmitted on the wintering grounds. We found a negative association between haemosporidian parasite... (More)
Carry-over effects take place when events occurring in one season influence individual performance in a subsequent season. Blood parasites (e.g. Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) have strong negative effects on the body condition of their hosts and could slow the rate of feather growth on the wintering grounds. In turn, these winter moult costs could reduce reproductive success in the following breeding season. In house martins Delichon urbica captured and studied at a breeding site in Europe, we used ptilochronology to measure growth rate of tail feathers moulted on the winter range in Africa, and assessed infection status of blood parasites transmitted on the wintering grounds. We found a negative association between haemosporidian parasite infection status and inferred growth rate of tail feathers. A low feather growth rate and blood parasite infections were related to a delay in laying date in their European breeding quarters. In addition, clutch size and the number of fledglings were negatively related to a delayed laying date and blood parasite infection. These results stress the importance of blood parasites and feather growth rate as potentially mechanisms driving carry-over effects to explain fitness differences in wild populations of migratory birds. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carry-over effects, Delichon urbica, Haemoproteus, Host-parasite, interaction, Plasmodium
in
Oecologia
volume
171
issue
4
pages
853 - 861
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000316906400009
  • scopus:84875676677
ISSN
1432-1939
DOI
10.1007/s00442-012-2444-3
project
Malaria in birds
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
da6054b7-17ba-4cb3-8f15-034a166543ff (old id 3745284)
date added to LUP
2013-05-21 12:18:37
date last changed
2019-04-02 02:05:04
@article{da6054b7-17ba-4cb3-8f15-034a166543ff,
  abstract     = {Carry-over effects take place when events occurring in one season influence individual performance in a subsequent season. Blood parasites (e.g. Plasmodium and Haemoproteus) have strong negative effects on the body condition of their hosts and could slow the rate of feather growth on the wintering grounds. In turn, these winter moult costs could reduce reproductive success in the following breeding season. In house martins Delichon urbica captured and studied at a breeding site in Europe, we used ptilochronology to measure growth rate of tail feathers moulted on the winter range in Africa, and assessed infection status of blood parasites transmitted on the wintering grounds. We found a negative association between haemosporidian parasite infection status and inferred growth rate of tail feathers. A low feather growth rate and blood parasite infections were related to a delay in laying date in their European breeding quarters. In addition, clutch size and the number of fledglings were negatively related to a delayed laying date and blood parasite infection. These results stress the importance of blood parasites and feather growth rate as potentially mechanisms driving carry-over effects to explain fitness differences in wild populations of migratory birds.},
  author       = {Marzal, Alfonso and Reviriego, Maribel and Hermosell, Ignacio G. and Balbontin, Javier and Bensch, Staffan and Relinque, Carmen and Rodriguez, Laura and Garcia-Longoria, Luz and de Lope, Florentino},
  issn         = {1432-1939},
  keyword      = {Carry-over effects,Delichon urbica,Haemoproteus,Host-parasite,interaction,Plasmodium},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {853--861},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Oecologia},
  title        = {Malaria infection and feather growth rate predict reproductive success in house martins},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00442-012-2444-3},
  volume       = {171},
  year         = {2013},
}