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Crystallography of the past and in the future

Liljas, Anders LU (2020) In Crystallography Reviews 26(2). p.101-112
Abstract

This paper is partly a summary of the book ‘From a grain of salt to the ribosome’ [1], with extension on some points. Sometimes the developments in science may be very rapid and not fully appreciated at all corners of the scientific society. Harry Clary Jones was a well-known chemist at Johns Hopkins University at the turn of the previous century. He had, in his earlier days, spent time in the laboratories of Wilhelm Ostwald in Leipzig, Svante Arrhenius in Stockholm and Jacobus van’t Hoff in Amsterdam. He wrote many papers and twelve books. In 1913 he claimed in a book [2]: We do not know the formula of rock salt, or of ice; and we have no reliable means of finding out these simplest matters about solids. Our ignorance of solids is very... (More)

This paper is partly a summary of the book ‘From a grain of salt to the ribosome’ [1], with extension on some points. Sometimes the developments in science may be very rapid and not fully appreciated at all corners of the scientific society. Harry Clary Jones was a well-known chemist at Johns Hopkins University at the turn of the previous century. He had, in his earlier days, spent time in the laboratories of Wilhelm Ostwald in Leipzig, Svante Arrhenius in Stockholm and Jacobus van’t Hoff in Amsterdam. He wrote many papers and twelve books. In 1913 he claimed in a book [2]: We do not know the formula of rock salt, or of ice; and we have no reliable means of finding out these simplest matters about solids. Our ignorance of solids is very nearly complete. It is evident that he was unaware of the very recent developments and the revolution in chemistry that had just taken place with the birth of X-ray crystallography.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
History of crystallography, Nobel Prizes, protein crystals, The Braggs, von Laue
in
Crystallography Reviews
volume
26
issue
2
pages
12 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:85084359215
ISSN
0889-311X
DOI
10.1080/0889311X.2020.1758076
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
db708a95-9b37-41ff-a752-424e33ffc609
date added to LUP
2020-06-10 15:53:09
date last changed
2020-06-11 02:07:41
@article{db708a95-9b37-41ff-a752-424e33ffc609,
  abstract     = {<p>This paper is partly a summary of the book ‘From a grain of salt to the ribosome’ [1], with extension on some points. Sometimes the developments in science may be very rapid and not fully appreciated at all corners of the scientific society. Harry Clary Jones was a well-known chemist at Johns Hopkins University at the turn of the previous century. He had, in his earlier days, spent time in the laboratories of Wilhelm Ostwald in Leipzig, Svante Arrhenius in Stockholm and Jacobus van’t Hoff in Amsterdam. He wrote many papers and twelve books. In 1913 he claimed in a book [2]: We do not know the formula of rock salt, or of ice; and we have no reliable means of finding out these simplest matters about solids. Our ignorance of solids is very nearly complete. It is evident that he was unaware of the very recent developments and the revolution in chemistry that had just taken place with the birth of X-ray crystallography.</p>},
  author       = {Liljas, Anders},
  issn         = {0889-311X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {101--112},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Crystallography Reviews},
  title        = {Crystallography of the past and in the future},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0889311X.2020.1758076},
  doi          = {10.1080/0889311X.2020.1758076},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2020},
}