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The majority of MRSA colonized children not given eradication treatment are still colonized one year later. Systemic antibiotics improve the eradication rate

Jörgensen, Jimmy LU ; Månsson, Fredrik LU ; Janson, Håkan LU ; Petersson, Ann Cathrine LU and Nilsson, Anna C. LU (2018) In Infectious Diseases
Abstract

Background: Colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can cause endogenously derived infections and be a source of transmission to other people. Neither colonization time of asymptomatic MRSA colonization nor the effect of treatment aiming at MRSA eradication in children has been thoroughly investigated. Methods: Two hundred ninety-three children <18 years in the mandatory follow-up program for MRSA-carriers in Malmö, Sweden were evaluated. Samples from the throat, nares, perineum and skin lesions from each child were screened for MRSA with a PCR-based broth enrichment method. PVL presence and spa-type were evaluated in a majority of cases. The sampling was repeated approximately every 6 month after initial... (More)

Background: Colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can cause endogenously derived infections and be a source of transmission to other people. Neither colonization time of asymptomatic MRSA colonization nor the effect of treatment aiming at MRSA eradication in children has been thoroughly investigated. Methods: Two hundred ninety-three children <18 years in the mandatory follow-up program for MRSA-carriers in Malmö, Sweden were evaluated. Samples from the throat, nares, perineum and skin lesions from each child were screened for MRSA with a PCR-based broth enrichment method. PVL presence and spa-type were evaluated in a majority of cases. The sampling was repeated approximately every 6 month after initial detection. When three consecutive sets of negative samples during at least a 6-month period were obtained, the MRSA was considered permanently eradicated. MRSA eradication treatment given, on clinical grounds during follow-up, was noted. Results: One year after detection 62% of the untreated children were still MRSA positive and after 2 years 28%. MRSA throat colonization and having MRSA positive household contacts significantly prolonged the observed colonization time. Topical MRSA eradication treatment was successful in 36% of cases and in 65% if systemic antibiotics were added. Presence of PVL correlated with shorter observed colonization time in the older age group and with increased eradication success among throat carriers. Conclusion: MRSA throat colonization and having MRSA positive household contacts prolongs the time of MRSA colonization in children. Systemic antibiotics enhance the effect of MRSA eradication treatment.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Carrier, Children, Colonization time, Eradication treatment, MRSA, Risk factors
in
Infectious Diseases
pages
10 pages
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • scopus:85046494592
ISSN
2374-4235
DOI
10.1080/23744235.2018.1459828
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dbec8953-73c0-4896-8c81-00c6fbee3e5f
date added to LUP
2018-05-15 10:51:47
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:25:22
@article{dbec8953-73c0-4896-8c81-00c6fbee3e5f,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can cause endogenously derived infections and be a source of transmission to other people. Neither colonization time of asymptomatic MRSA colonization nor the effect of treatment aiming at MRSA eradication in children has been thoroughly investigated. Methods: Two hundred ninety-three children &lt;18 years in the mandatory follow-up program for MRSA-carriers in Malmö, Sweden were evaluated. Samples from the throat, nares, perineum and skin lesions from each child were screened for MRSA with a PCR-based broth enrichment method. PVL presence and spa-type were evaluated in a majority of cases. The sampling was repeated approximately every 6 month after initial detection. When three consecutive sets of negative samples during at least a 6-month period were obtained, the MRSA was considered permanently eradicated. MRSA eradication treatment given, on clinical grounds during follow-up, was noted. Results: One year after detection 62% of the untreated children were still MRSA positive and after 2 years 28%. MRSA throat colonization and having MRSA positive household contacts significantly prolonged the observed colonization time. Topical MRSA eradication treatment was successful in 36% of cases and in 65% if systemic antibiotics were added. Presence of PVL correlated with shorter observed colonization time in the older age group and with increased eradication success among throat carriers. Conclusion: MRSA throat colonization and having MRSA positive household contacts prolongs the time of MRSA colonization in children. Systemic antibiotics enhance the effect of MRSA eradication treatment.</p>},
  author       = {Jörgensen, Jimmy and Månsson, Fredrik and Janson, Håkan and Petersson, Ann Cathrine and Nilsson, Anna C.},
  issn         = {2374-4235},
  keyword      = {Carrier,Children,Colonization time,Eradication treatment,MRSA,Risk factors},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  pages        = {10},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {The majority of MRSA colonized children not given eradication treatment are still colonized one year later. Systemic antibiotics improve the eradication rate},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/23744235.2018.1459828},
  year         = {2018},
}