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Test–retest reliability of Antonovsky’s 13-item sense of coherence scale in patients with hand-related disorders

Hansen, Alice Ørts; Kristensen, Hanne Kaae; Cederlund, Ragnhild LU and Tromborg, Hans (2017) In Disability and Rehabilitation 39(20). p.2105-2111
Abstract

Purpose: To report on the distribution and test-retest reliability of Antonovsky’s 13-item Sense of Coherence (SOC-13) Scale in patients with hand-related disorders (HRD). Links between the SOC-13 score and factors such as age, number of days between date of injury and start of rehabilitation, gender and educational level were explored. Method: Survey with test–retest, using self-administered questionnaire. SOC-13 was completed before starting rehabilitation at an outpatient clinic after 14 days and three months. Adult patients with HRD were included. Results: A total of 170 participants completed the SOC-13 at baseline (median SOC 71, range 30–91). The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient between baseline and 14 days was 0.84 (n = 151),... (More)

Purpose: To report on the distribution and test-retest reliability of Antonovsky’s 13-item Sense of Coherence (SOC-13) Scale in patients with hand-related disorders (HRD). Links between the SOC-13 score and factors such as age, number of days between date of injury and start of rehabilitation, gender and educational level were explored. Method: Survey with test–retest, using self-administered questionnaire. SOC-13 was completed before starting rehabilitation at an outpatient clinic after 14 days and three months. Adult patients with HRD were included. Results: A total of 170 participants completed the SOC-13 at baseline (median SOC 71, range 30–91). The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient between baseline and 14 days was 0.84 (n = 151), and baseline and three months was 0.79 (n = 113). Weak correlations were found between SOC and age rs = 0.17, p < 0.03. No correlation was found between SOC and number of days since injury rs = 0.01, p > 0.92. No difference was found in SOC score related to gender or educational level. Conclusions: The SOC-13 scale showed reliability for patients with HRD. There was a weak connection between age and SOC without clinical relevance. SOC-13 has the potential to be a powerful tool to measure the ICF component personal factors, which could have an impact on patients’ rehabilitation outcomes.Implications for rehabilitationAntonovsky’s SOC-13 scale showed test-retest reliability for patients with hand-related disorders.The SOC-13 scale could be a suitable tool to help measure personal factors.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hand-related injuries, psychometrics, Sense of coherence, SOC-13
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
39
issue
20
pages
2105 - 2111
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:84986237213
  • wos:000406712900012
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.1080/09638288.2016.1215555
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ddc5d3d9-25c9-4624-8e29-99f2a3798190
date added to LUP
2016-12-28 12:35:42
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:42:50
@article{ddc5d3d9-25c9-4624-8e29-99f2a3798190,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose: To report on the distribution and test-retest reliability of Antonovsky’s 13-item Sense of Coherence (SOC-13) Scale in patients with hand-related disorders (HRD). Links between the SOC-13 score and factors such as age, number of days between date of injury and start of rehabilitation, gender and educational level were explored. Method: Survey with test–retest, using self-administered questionnaire. SOC-13 was completed before starting rehabilitation at an outpatient clinic after 14 days and three months. Adult patients with HRD were included. Results: A total of 170 participants completed the SOC-13 at baseline (median SOC 71, range 30–91). The Intra-class Correlation Coefficient between baseline and 14 days was 0.84 (n = 151), and baseline and three months was 0.79 (n = 113). Weak correlations were found between SOC and age rs = 0.17, p &lt; 0.03. No correlation was found between SOC and number of days since injury rs = 0.01, p &gt; 0.92. No difference was found in SOC score related to gender or educational level. Conclusions: The SOC-13 scale showed reliability for patients with HRD. There was a weak connection between age and SOC without clinical relevance. SOC-13 has the potential to be a powerful tool to measure the ICF component personal factors, which could have an impact on patients’ rehabilitation outcomes.Implications for rehabilitationAntonovsky’s SOC-13 scale showed test-retest reliability for patients with hand-related disorders.The SOC-13 scale could be a suitable tool to help measure personal factors.</p>},
  author       = {Hansen, Alice Ørts and Kristensen, Hanne Kaae and Cederlund, Ragnhild and Tromborg, Hans},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  keyword      = {hand-related injuries,psychometrics,Sense of coherence,SOC-13},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {20},
  pages        = {2105--2111},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Test–retest reliability of Antonovsky’s 13-item sense of coherence scale in patients with hand-related disorders},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09638288.2016.1215555},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2017},
}