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Estimating the potential health impact and costs of implementing a local policy for food procurement to reduce the consumption of sodium in the county of Los Angeles

Gase, Lauren N; Kuo, Tony; Dunet, Diane; Schmidt, Steven M LU ; Simon, Paul A and Fielding, Jonathan E (2011) In American Journal of Public Health 101(8). p.7-1501
Abstract

OBJECTIVES: We examined approaches to reduce sodium content of food served in settings operated or funded by the government of the County of Los Angeles, California.

METHODS: We adapted health impact assessment methods to mathematically simulate various levels of reduction in the sodium content of food served by the County of Los Angeles and to estimate the reductions' potential impacts on mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) among food-service customers. We used data provided by county government food-service vendors to generate these simulations.

RESULTS: Our analysis predicted that if the postulated sodium-reduction strategies were implemented, adults would consume, on average, 233 fewer milligrams of sodium each day. This... (More)

OBJECTIVES: We examined approaches to reduce sodium content of food served in settings operated or funded by the government of the County of Los Angeles, California.

METHODS: We adapted health impact assessment methods to mathematically simulate various levels of reduction in the sodium content of food served by the County of Los Angeles and to estimate the reductions' potential impacts on mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) among food-service customers. We used data provided by county government food-service vendors to generate these simulations.

RESULTS: Our analysis predicted that if the postulated sodium-reduction strategies were implemented, adults would consume, on average, 233 fewer milligrams of sodium each day. This would correspond to an average decrease of 0.71 millimeters of mercury in SBP among adult hypertensives, 388 fewer cases of uncontrolled hypertension in the study population, and an annual decrease of $629,724 in direct health care costs.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a food-procurement policy can contribute to positive health and economic effects at the local level. Our approach may serve as an example of sodium-reduction analysis for other jurisdictions to follow.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Adolescent, Adult, Blood Pressure, Child, Child, Preschool, Costs and Cost Analysis, Food Analysis, Food Services, Health Promotion, Humans, Infant, Local Government, Los Angeles, Nutrition Policy, Sodium, Dietary, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
in
American Journal of Public Health
volume
101
issue
8
pages
7 pages
publisher
Amer Public Health Assoc Inc
external identifiers
  • scopus:79960448818
ISSN
1541-0048
DOI
10.2105/AJPH.2011.300138
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
ddd0f66d-1f1f-433e-90c5-f293f3cc7391
date added to LUP
2017-03-08 12:04:34
date last changed
2017-11-05 05:14:57
@article{ddd0f66d-1f1f-433e-90c5-f293f3cc7391,
  abstract     = {<p>OBJECTIVES: We examined approaches to reduce sodium content of food served in settings operated or funded by the government of the County of Los Angeles, California.</p><p>METHODS: We adapted health impact assessment methods to mathematically simulate various levels of reduction in the sodium content of food served by the County of Los Angeles and to estimate the reductions' potential impacts on mean systolic blood pressure (SBP) among food-service customers. We used data provided by county government food-service vendors to generate these simulations.</p><p>RESULTS: Our analysis predicted that if the postulated sodium-reduction strategies were implemented, adults would consume, on average, 233 fewer milligrams of sodium each day. This would correspond to an average decrease of 0.71 millimeters of mercury in SBP among adult hypertensives, 388 fewer cases of uncontrolled hypertension in the study population, and an annual decrease of $629,724 in direct health care costs.</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a food-procurement policy can contribute to positive health and economic effects at the local level. Our approach may serve as an example of sodium-reduction analysis for other jurisdictions to follow.</p>},
  author       = {Gase, Lauren N and Kuo, Tony and Dunet, Diane and Schmidt, Steven M and Simon, Paul A and Fielding, Jonathan E},
  issn         = {1541-0048},
  keyword      = {Adolescent,Adult,Blood Pressure,Child,Child, Preschool,Costs and Cost Analysis,Food Analysis,Food Services,Health Promotion,Humans,Infant,Local Government,Los Angeles,Nutrition Policy,Sodium, Dietary,Journal Article,Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {7--1501},
  publisher    = {Amer Public Health Assoc Inc},
  series       = {American Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Estimating the potential health impact and costs of implementing a local policy for food procurement to reduce the consumption of sodium in the county of Los Angeles},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2011.300138},
  volume       = {101},
  year         = {2011},
}