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Drying of biofuels from the forest—A review

Stenström, Stig LU (2017) In Drying Technology 35(10). p.1167-1181
Abstract

The literature during 2000–2016 about drying of biofuels from the forest has been reviewed. Biofuels constitute a low-cost energy resource that is likely to continue to increase and the dryers for such products should be simple, robust, and easy to operate. In 1970s and 1980s, rotary dryers and flash dryers were the most common types, and in 1990s, superheated steam (SHS) dryers became common. Maintenance costs and use of medium pressure steam for the SHS dryers are important topics to consider and one drawback for the rotary dryers is that high-temperature heat sources are used. The development during the last 15 years has moved toward moving bed dryers because of the possibility to use cheap low-temperature energy sources, robust... (More)

The literature during 2000–2016 about drying of biofuels from the forest has been reviewed. Biofuels constitute a low-cost energy resource that is likely to continue to increase and the dryers for such products should be simple, robust, and easy to operate. In 1970s and 1980s, rotary dryers and flash dryers were the most common types, and in 1990s, superheated steam (SHS) dryers became common. Maintenance costs and use of medium pressure steam for the SHS dryers are important topics to consider and one drawback for the rotary dryers is that high-temperature heat sources are used. The development during the last 15 years has moved toward moving bed dryers because of the possibility to use cheap low-temperature energy sources, robust design, and direct capacity control that is achieved by controlling the air temperature in the dryer. A price for the dry biofuel of 15–20 Euro/MWh has been indicated to make a dryer installation profitable based on no cost for the thermal energy and 40 Euro/MWh as the cost for the electrical energy. Shrinkage and the internal transport of moisture and heat in large particles of biofuels will need more considerations in the future. Fractionation of the biofuels, codrying with other products, the total cost for the drying process, environmental issues, and development of drying processes operating at high dew points are the other things to consider.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bed dryer, biofuels, costs, drying, modeling, review, superheated steam
in
Drying Technology
volume
35
issue
10
pages
15 pages
publisher
TAPPI
external identifiers
  • scopus:85026672300
  • wos:000406767100001
ISSN
0737-3937
DOI
10.1080/07373937.2016.1258571
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
de074293-68ec-4a81-9fd5-4ffdcd07fbc0
date added to LUP
2017-08-31 12:18:31
date last changed
2017-09-18 11:43:39
@article{de074293-68ec-4a81-9fd5-4ffdcd07fbc0,
  abstract     = {<p>The literature during 2000–2016 about drying of biofuels from the forest has been reviewed. Biofuels constitute a low-cost energy resource that is likely to continue to increase and the dryers for such products should be simple, robust, and easy to operate. In 1970s and 1980s, rotary dryers and flash dryers were the most common types, and in 1990s, superheated steam (SHS) dryers became common. Maintenance costs and use of medium pressure steam for the SHS dryers are important topics to consider and one drawback for the rotary dryers is that high-temperature heat sources are used. The development during the last 15 years has moved toward moving bed dryers because of the possibility to use cheap low-temperature energy sources, robust design, and direct capacity control that is achieved by controlling the air temperature in the dryer. A price for the dry biofuel of 15–20 Euro/MWh has been indicated to make a dryer installation profitable based on no cost for the thermal energy and 40 Euro/MWh as the cost for the electrical energy. Shrinkage and the internal transport of moisture and heat in large particles of biofuels will need more considerations in the future. Fractionation of the biofuels, codrying with other products, the total cost for the drying process, environmental issues, and development of drying processes operating at high dew points are the other things to consider.</p>},
  author       = {Stenström, Stig},
  issn         = {0737-3937},
  keyword      = {Bed dryer,biofuels,costs,drying,modeling,review,superheated steam},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1167--1181},
  publisher    = {TAPPI},
  series       = {Drying Technology},
  title        = {Drying of biofuels from the forest—A review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07373937.2016.1258571},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2017},
}