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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate in Freestyle® Libre, a newly introduced glucose sensor

Herman, Anne; Aerts, Olivier; Baeck, Marie; Bruze, Magnus LU ; De Block, Christophe; Goossens, An; Hamnerius, Nils LU ; Huygens, Sara; Maiter, Dominique and Tennstedt, Dominique, et al. (2017) In Contact Dermatitis 77(6). p.367-373
Abstract

Background: Glucose sensors, such as FreeStyle® Libre, are innovative medical devices developed for diabetes patients as a replacement for classic glucose meters, ensuring continuous glucose monitoring without the disadvantage of regular skin finger pricks. Objectives: To report several cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre, and to report on isobornyl acrylate as a culprit allergen. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients presented with allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre. All but 1 were patch tested with a baseline series, and with pieces and/or ultrasonic bath extracts of (the adhesive part of) the glucose sensor. Isobornyl acrylate was patch tested, in various concentrations and vehicles,... (More)

Background: Glucose sensors, such as FreeStyle® Libre, are innovative medical devices developed for diabetes patients as a replacement for classic glucose meters, ensuring continuous glucose monitoring without the disadvantage of regular skin finger pricks. Objectives: To report several cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre, and to report on isobornyl acrylate as a culprit allergen. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients presented with allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre. All but 1 were patch tested with a baseline series, and with pieces and/or ultrasonic bath extracts of (the adhesive part of) the glucose sensor. Isobornyl acrylate was patch tested, in various concentrations and vehicles, in 13 patients. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the sensors was performed. Results: All patients reacted to the adhesive part of the sensor, and 12 patients were shown to be sensitized to isobornyl acrylate. Simultaneous reactions to other allergens were rarely observed. GC-MS showed the presence of isobornyl acrylate in the sensors. Conclusions: Cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre are increasingly being observed, and isobornyl acrylate is a relevant culprit allergen. Cross-reactivity to other acrylates was infrequently observed, but other, hitherto unidentified, contact allergens may still be present in the device.

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published
subject
keywords
acrylates, adhesive, allergic contact dermatitis, CAS no. 5888-33-5, diabetes mellitus, FreeStyle® Libre, gas chromatography, glucose sensor, isobornyl acrylate, mass spectrometry, medical device, sesquiterpene lactone mix
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
77
issue
6
pages
7 pages
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85032723837
  • wos:000416020900004
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.12866
language
English
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yes
id
de31280e-ec3b-44ab-a96d-e05eef060643
date added to LUP
2017-12-12 08:11:30
date last changed
2018-05-13 04:37:13
@article{de31280e-ec3b-44ab-a96d-e05eef060643,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Glucose sensors, such as FreeStyle® Libre, are innovative medical devices developed for diabetes patients as a replacement for classic glucose meters, ensuring continuous glucose monitoring without the disadvantage of regular skin finger pricks. Objectives: To report several cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre, and to report on isobornyl acrylate as a culprit allergen. Patients and Methods: Fifteen patients presented with allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre. All but 1 were patch tested with a baseline series, and with pieces and/or ultrasonic bath extracts of (the adhesive part of) the glucose sensor. Isobornyl acrylate was patch tested, in various concentrations and vehicles, in 13 patients. Gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of the sensors was performed. Results: All patients reacted to the adhesive part of the sensor, and 12 patients were shown to be sensitized to isobornyl acrylate. Simultaneous reactions to other allergens were rarely observed. GC-MS showed the presence of isobornyl acrylate in the sensors. Conclusions: Cases of allergic contact dermatitis caused by FreeStyle® Libre are increasingly being observed, and isobornyl acrylate is a relevant culprit allergen. Cross-reactivity to other acrylates was infrequently observed, but other, hitherto unidentified, contact allergens may still be present in the device.</p>},
  author       = {Herman, Anne and Aerts, Olivier and Baeck, Marie and Bruze, Magnus and De Block, Christophe and Goossens, An and Hamnerius, Nils and Huygens, Sara and Maiter, Dominique and Tennstedt, Dominique and Vandeleene, Bernard and Mowitz, Martin},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {acrylates,adhesive,allergic contact dermatitis,CAS no. 5888-33-5,diabetes mellitus,FreeStyle® Libre,gas chromatography,glucose sensor,isobornyl acrylate,mass spectrometry,medical device,sesquiterpene lactone mix},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {367--373},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate in Freestyle® Libre, a newly introduced glucose sensor},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.12866},
  volume       = {77},
  year         = {2017},
}