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Computer-based education for patients with chronic heart failure - A randomised, controlled, multicentre trial of the effects on knowledge, compliance and quality of life

Stromberg, Anna ; Dahlstrom, Ulf and Fridlund, Bengt LU (2006) In Patient Education and Counseling 64(1-3). p.128-135
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the effects of a single-session, interactive computer-based educational program on knowledge, compliance and quality of life in heart failure patients with special emphasis on gender differences. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients, mean age 70 years, from five heart failure clinics were randomised to either receiving only standard education (n = 72) or standard education and additional computer-based education (n = 82). Results: Knowledge was increased in both groups after I month with a trend towards higher knowledge (P = 0.07) in the computer-based group. The increase in knowledge was significantly higher in the computer-based group after 6 months (P = 0.03). No differences were found between the groups... (More)
Objective: To evaluate the effects of a single-session, interactive computer-based educational program on knowledge, compliance and quality of life in heart failure patients with special emphasis on gender differences. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients, mean age 70 years, from five heart failure clinics were randomised to either receiving only standard education (n = 72) or standard education and additional computer-based education (n = 82). Results: Knowledge was increased in both groups after I month with a trend towards higher knowledge (P = 0.07) in the computer-based group. The increase in knowledge was significantly higher in the computer-based group after 6 months (P = 0.03). No differences were found between the groups with regard to compliance with treatment and self-care or quality of life. The women had significantly lower quality of life and did not improve after 6 months as the men did (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Computer-based education gave increased knowledge about heart failure. Practice implications: Computers can be a useful too] in heart failure education, but to improve compliance a single-session educational intervention is not sufficient. Gender differences in learning and quality of life should be further evaluated. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
compliance, nursing, self-care, intervention, patient education, heart failure, computer-based education, quality of life, knowledge, gender
in
Patient Education and Counseling
volume
64
issue
1-3
pages
128 - 135
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000243012600016
  • scopus:33751080118
ISSN
0738-3991
DOI
10.1016/j.pec.2005.12.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Nursing (Closed 2012) (013065000)
id
de609aa5-33ed-442f-a0cf-59d62e829f33 (old id 681447)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:30:07
date last changed
2019-12-10 02:43:57
@article{de609aa5-33ed-442f-a0cf-59d62e829f33,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate the effects of a single-session, interactive computer-based educational program on knowledge, compliance and quality of life in heart failure patients with special emphasis on gender differences. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients, mean age 70 years, from five heart failure clinics were randomised to either receiving only standard education (n = 72) or standard education and additional computer-based education (n = 82). Results: Knowledge was increased in both groups after I month with a trend towards higher knowledge (P = 0.07) in the computer-based group. The increase in knowledge was significantly higher in the computer-based group after 6 months (P = 0.03). No differences were found between the groups with regard to compliance with treatment and self-care or quality of life. The women had significantly lower quality of life and did not improve after 6 months as the men did (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Computer-based education gave increased knowledge about heart failure. Practice implications: Computers can be a useful too] in heart failure education, but to improve compliance a single-session educational intervention is not sufficient. Gender differences in learning and quality of life should be further evaluated. (c) 2005 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Stromberg, Anna and Dahlstrom, Ulf and Fridlund, Bengt},
  issn         = {0738-3991},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-3},
  pages        = {128--135},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Patient Education and Counseling},
  title        = {Computer-based education for patients with chronic heart failure - A randomised, controlled, multicentre trial of the effects on knowledge, compliance and quality of life},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pec.2005.12.007},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.pec.2005.12.007},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2006},
}