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Carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis of haemophilia - utilisation and psychological consequences

Tedgård, U. LU (1998) In Haemophilia 4(4). p.365-369
Abstract

Attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis, and abortion vary widely between different countries, religions, cultures and over time. Carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis (PD) of haemophilia have become an integrated part of the comprehensive care for haemophilia in Sweden as well as in many other countries. Almost all carriers are interested in carrier testing if they are aware of the possibility. With the development of PD by chorionic villus sampling in the first trimester, the method became acceptable for many carriers, and it has in Sweden actually had an effect on the incidence of haemophilia in the 1990s. The use of PD is more common among women who perceive haemophilia as a very serious disease and who have a positive attitude... (More)

Attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis, and abortion vary widely between different countries, religions, cultures and over time. Carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis (PD) of haemophilia have become an integrated part of the comprehensive care for haemophilia in Sweden as well as in many other countries. Almost all carriers are interested in carrier testing if they are aware of the possibility. With the development of PD by chorionic villus sampling in the first trimester, the method became acceptable for many carriers, and it has in Sweden actually had an effect on the incidence of haemophilia in the 1990s. The use of PD is more common among women who perceive haemophilia as a very serious disease and who have a positive attitude towards legal abortion. The main reason for carriers not to use PD was that they do not find haemophilia to be a sufficiently serious disorder to justify an abortion. Women and their spouses are under a great deal of psychological pressure in association with the PD procedure, and the psychological consequences of having to terminate a pregnancy are long-lasting. At follow-up, about 6 years after PD and abortion, these women, however, do not have more signs of psychological distress than women without PD experience. Nevertheless, they must be offered qualified assistance both before and after PD as well as adequate follow-up after an abortion to help them cope with the emotional strain they are under.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Carrier testing, Haemophilia, Prenatal diagnosis, Psychology, Risk factors
in
Haemophilia
volume
4
issue
4
pages
5 pages
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:0031858613
ISSN
1351-8216
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e0267d3a-93b3-48db-a541-05006e5f88e6
date added to LUP
2017-02-16 15:49:27
date last changed
2017-02-17 14:19:43
@article{e0267d3a-93b3-48db-a541-05006e5f88e6,
  abstract     = {<p>Attitudes towards prenatal diagnosis, and abortion vary widely between different countries, religions, cultures and over time. Carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis (PD) of haemophilia have become an integrated part of the comprehensive care for haemophilia in Sweden as well as in many other countries. Almost all carriers are interested in carrier testing if they are aware of the possibility. With the development of PD by chorionic villus sampling in the first trimester, the method became acceptable for many carriers, and it has in Sweden actually had an effect on the incidence of haemophilia in the 1990s. The use of PD is more common among women who perceive haemophilia as a very serious disease and who have a positive attitude towards legal abortion. The main reason for carriers not to use PD was that they do not find haemophilia to be a sufficiently serious disorder to justify an abortion. Women and their spouses are under a great deal of psychological pressure in association with the PD procedure, and the psychological consequences of having to terminate a pregnancy are long-lasting. At follow-up, about 6 years after PD and abortion, these women, however, do not have more signs of psychological distress than women without PD experience. Nevertheless, they must be offered qualified assistance both before and after PD as well as adequate follow-up after an abortion to help them cope with the emotional strain they are under.</p>},
  author       = {Tedgård, U.},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  keyword      = {Carrier testing,Haemophilia,Prenatal diagnosis,Psychology,Risk factors},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {365--369},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {Carrier testing and prenatal diagnosis of haemophilia - utilisation and psychological consequences},
  volume       = {4},
  year         = {1998},
}