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Impact of construction-related rework on selected Ugandan public projects

Kakitahi, John Muhumuza LU ; Alinaitwe, Henry Mwanaki LU ; Landin, Anne LU and Mone, Simon James (2016) In Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology 14(2). p.238-251
Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this paper was to assess the magnitude of the impact of construction-related rework on selected project budgets and schedule in public building construction in Uganda. The magnitude of construction-related rework was the mean determined over construction contracts under a selected project and expressed as a percentage of the construction contract sum. Design/methodology/approachA single case multi-unit study approach was adopted. A case study protocol was prepared that included a checklist, observation schedules and an interview guide. The three instruments were used to collect data from building contractors and end-users (the teaching staff and medical assistants). Representatives of the client entity and the... (More)

Purpose The purpose of this paper was to assess the magnitude of the impact of construction-related rework on selected project budgets and schedule in public building construction in Uganda. The magnitude of construction-related rework was the mean determined over construction contracts under a selected project and expressed as a percentage of the construction contract sum. Design/methodology/approachA single case multi-unit study approach was adopted. A case study protocol was prepared that included a checklist, observation schedules and an interview guide. The three instruments were used to collect data from building contractors and end-users (the teaching staff and medical assistants). Representatives of the client entity and the end-users provided sufficient project documentation and related supplementary information for the study. FindingsConstruction-related rework was predominantly attributable to design information omissions, unacceptable workmanship and inadequate supervision of the contractor. Lightning conductor, electrical and roofing installations were the building elements that had the highest frequency of rework. It was further determined that the mean percentage of rework related impact on project budget and schedule was approximately 4.53 and 8.42 per cent, respectively. Originality/valueThe findings inform policy makers about likely areas that contribute to significant wastage and value loss in quality management of public sector projects. The research advocates for improved data collection protocols, integration of adequate design management and a whole life value philosophy during the public building construction process.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Construction project management, Quality issues, Quality management
in
Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology
volume
14
issue
2
pages
14 pages
publisher
Emerald Group Publishing Limited
external identifiers
  • scopus:84971671570
  • wos:000405490100002
ISSN
1726-0531
DOI
10.1108/JEDT-02-2014-0006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e211adfd-3ba7-4b2d-923b-a359919ad0dd
date added to LUP
2017-02-08 10:56:45
date last changed
2017-11-05 05:13:22
@article{e211adfd-3ba7-4b2d-923b-a359919ad0dd,
  abstract     = {<p>Purpose The purpose of this paper was to assess the magnitude of the impact of construction-related rework on selected project budgets and schedule in public building construction in Uganda. The magnitude of construction-related rework was the mean determined over construction contracts under a selected project and expressed as a percentage of the construction contract sum. Design/methodology/approachA single case multi-unit study approach was adopted. A case study protocol was prepared that included a checklist, observation schedules and an interview guide. The three instruments were used to collect data from building contractors and end-users (the teaching staff and medical assistants). Representatives of the client entity and the end-users provided sufficient project documentation and related supplementary information for the study. FindingsConstruction-related rework was predominantly attributable to design information omissions, unacceptable workmanship and inadequate supervision of the contractor. Lightning conductor, electrical and roofing installations were the building elements that had the highest frequency of rework. It was further determined that the mean percentage of rework related impact on project budget and schedule was approximately 4.53 and 8.42 per cent, respectively. Originality/valueThe findings inform policy makers about likely areas that contribute to significant wastage and value loss in quality management of public sector projects. The research advocates for improved data collection protocols, integration of adequate design management and a whole life value philosophy during the public building construction process.</p>},
  author       = {Kakitahi, John Muhumuza and Alinaitwe, Henry Mwanaki and Landin, Anne and Mone, Simon James},
  issn         = {1726-0531},
  keyword      = {Construction project management,Quality issues,Quality management},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {238--251},
  publisher    = {Emerald Group Publishing Limited},
  series       = {Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology},
  title        = {Impact of construction-related rework on selected Ugandan public projects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JEDT-02-2014-0006},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2016},
}