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Three Generations of Western Assassinations in the Global South, Decolonization and the Progressivist Narrative of International Law

Gunneflo, Markus LU (2016) historicizing International (Humanitarian) Law: Could we? Should we?
Abstract (Swedish)
This paper situates political assassinations by Western states in the global south in a wider discussion concerning decolonization and the progressivist narrative of international law. The paper looks at three generations of such assassinations, focusing on the international legal environments in which they took place and setting the parameters for both legitimation and opposition: the mid-twentieth century liberation struggles in Africa and the Middle East, the era of the new states that followed and, finally, the late twentieth- and early twenty-first century era of counter-terrorism hegemony. Looking at these three generations from the perspective of Antony Anghie’s notion of the “dynamic of difference” – the mechanisms through which... (More)
This paper situates political assassinations by Western states in the global south in a wider discussion concerning decolonization and the progressivist narrative of international law. The paper looks at three generations of such assassinations, focusing on the international legal environments in which they took place and setting the parameters for both legitimation and opposition: the mid-twentieth century liberation struggles in Africa and the Middle East, the era of the new states that followed and, finally, the late twentieth- and early twenty-first century era of counter-terrorism hegemony. Looking at these three generations from the perspective of Antony Anghie’s notion of the “dynamic of difference” – the mechanisms through which international law constantly evolves and, at the same time returns to its colonial heritage – the paper offers a reflection on the rise and fall of an international law that might be able to put an end to such killings and a critique of what might be seen as the establishment of a transnational law for political assassinations. (Less)
Abstract
This paper situates political assassinations by Western states in the global south in a wider discussion concerning decolonization and the progressivist narrative of international law. The paper looks at three generations of such assassinations, focusing on the international legal environments in which they took place and setting the parameters for both legitimation and opposition: the mid-twentieth century liberation struggles in Africa and the Middle East, the era of the new states that followed and, finally, the late twentieth- and early twenty-first century era of counter-terrorism hegemony. Looking at these three generations from the perspective of Antony Anghie’s notion of the “dynamic of difference” – the mechanisms through which... (More)
This paper situates political assassinations by Western states in the global south in a wider discussion concerning decolonization and the progressivist narrative of international law. The paper looks at three generations of such assassinations, focusing on the international legal environments in which they took place and setting the parameters for both legitimation and opposition: the mid-twentieth century liberation struggles in Africa and the Middle East, the era of the new states that followed and, finally, the late twentieth- and early twenty-first century era of counter-terrorism hegemony. Looking at these three generations from the perspective of Antony Anghie’s notion of the “dynamic of difference” – the mechanisms through which international law constantly evolves and, at the same time returns to its colonial heritage – the paper offers a reflection on the rise and fall of an international law that might be able to put an end to such killings and a critique of what might be seen as the establishment of a transnational law for political assassinations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to conference
publication status
published
subject
keywords
folkrätt, lönnmord, international law, assassinations
conference name
historicizing International (Humanitarian) Law: Could we? Should we?
language
Swedish
LU publication?
yes
id
e2e1561c-f49c-4e5a-a00b-bd5af8787d29
date added to LUP
2017-01-23 15:25:11
date last changed
2017-01-24 08:31:21
@misc{e2e1561c-f49c-4e5a-a00b-bd5af8787d29,
  abstract     = {This paper situates political assassinations by Western states in the global south in a wider discussion concerning decolonization and the progressivist narrative of international law. The paper looks at three generations of such assassinations, focusing on the international legal environments in which they took place and setting the parameters for both legitimation and opposition: the mid-twentieth century liberation struggles in Africa and the Middle East, the era of the new states that followed and, finally, the late twentieth- and early twenty-first century era of counter-terrorism hegemony. Looking at these three generations from the perspective of Antony Anghie’s notion of the “dynamic of difference” – the mechanisms through which international law constantly evolves and, at the same time returns to its colonial heritage – the paper offers a reflection on the rise and fall of an international law that might be able to put an end to such killings and a critique of what might be seen as the establishment of a transnational law for political assassinations.},
  author       = {Gunneflo, Markus},
  keyword      = {folkrätt,lönnmord,international law,assassinations},
  language     = {swe},
  month        = {10},
  title        = {Three Generations of Western Assassinations in the Global South, Decolonization and the Progressivist Narrative of International Law},
  year         = {2016},
}