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Design for deconstruction in the design process : State of the art

Kanters, Jouri LU (2018) In Buildings 8(11).
Abstract

Stricter building regulations have resulted in the construction of buildings with a low energy use during the operation phase. It has now become increasingly important to also look at the embodied energy, because it might, over the lifespan of the building, equal the energy used for operating the building. One way to decrease the embodied energy is to reuse building materials and components or to prepare the building for deconstruction; a term called design for deconstruction (DfD). While design for deconstruction has showed environmental, social, and economic benefits, hardly any building designed and built today is designed for deconstruction. The aim of this literature review is to understand the state-of-art of design for... (More)

Stricter building regulations have resulted in the construction of buildings with a low energy use during the operation phase. It has now become increasingly important to also look at the embodied energy, because it might, over the lifespan of the building, equal the energy used for operating the building. One way to decrease the embodied energy is to reuse building materials and components or to prepare the building for deconstruction; a term called design for deconstruction (DfD). While design for deconstruction has showed environmental, social, and economic benefits, hardly any building designed and built today is designed for deconstruction. The aim of this literature review is to understand the state-of-art of design for deconstruction and how it affects the design process. In most of the literature, general construction principles are specified that promote the design for deconstruction and focus on (a) the overall building design, (b) materials and connections, (c) construction and deconstruction phase, and (d) communication, competence, and knowledge. Furthermore, the reuse potential of specific building materials is discussed, as well as the available tools for DfD. Additionally, the current barriers for DfD as specified by the literature show lack of competence, regulations, and other related elements.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Architecture, Design for deconstruction, Design process
in
Buildings
volume
8
issue
11
publisher
MDPI AG
external identifiers
  • scopus:85057002204
ISSN
2075-5309
DOI
10.3390/buildings8110150
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e4f2abb3-4f82-4191-abb6-ea0236a921e3
date added to LUP
2018-12-04 09:04:26
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:38:52
@article{e4f2abb3-4f82-4191-abb6-ea0236a921e3,
  abstract     = {<p>Stricter building regulations have resulted in the construction of buildings with a low energy use during the operation phase. It has now become increasingly important to also look at the embodied energy, because it might, over the lifespan of the building, equal the energy used for operating the building. One way to decrease the embodied energy is to reuse building materials and components or to prepare the building for deconstruction; a term called design for deconstruction (DfD). While design for deconstruction has showed environmental, social, and economic benefits, hardly any building designed and built today is designed for deconstruction. The aim of this literature review is to understand the state-of-art of design for deconstruction and how it affects the design process. In most of the literature, general construction principles are specified that promote the design for deconstruction and focus on (a) the overall building design, (b) materials and connections, (c) construction and deconstruction phase, and (d) communication, competence, and knowledge. Furthermore, the reuse potential of specific building materials is discussed, as well as the available tools for DfD. Additionally, the current barriers for DfD as specified by the literature show lack of competence, regulations, and other related elements.</p>},
  articleno    = {150},
  author       = {Kanters, Jouri},
  issn         = {2075-5309},
  keyword      = {Architecture,Design for deconstruction,Design process},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {11},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  series       = {Buildings},
  title        = {Design for deconstruction in the design process : State of the art},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/buildings8110150},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2018},
}