Advanced

The case for protoconcepts : Why concepts, language, and protolanguage all need protoconcepts

Parthemore, Joel LU (2014) In Theoria et Historia Scientiarum 11. p.159-178
Abstract
Fodor is infamous for his radical conceptual nativism, McDowell likewise well-known for suggesting that concepts extend “all the way out” into the world and arguing against what he calls (per Sellars) The Myth of the Given: the idea that non-conceptual percepts justify conceptual frameworks. One need not go so far as either researcher, however, in allowing merit to their arguments. It seems we are predisposed, from the beginning of our lives, to look at the world in certain ways and not others. The world need not be “fully conceptual” to be never entirely free, for the conceptually minded agent, of conceptual taint. It seems structured remarkably like our concepts are structured because our concepts present it that way, and our concepts... (More)
Fodor is infamous for his radical conceptual nativism, McDowell likewise well-known for suggesting that concepts extend “all the way out” into the world and arguing against what he calls (per Sellars) The Myth of the Given: the idea that non-conceptual percepts justify conceptual frameworks. One need not go so far as either researcher, however, in allowing merit to their arguments. It seems we are predisposed, from the beginning of our lives, to look at the world in certain ways and not others. The world need not be “fully conceptual” to be never entirely free, for the conceptually minded agent, of conceptual taint. It seems structured remarkably like our concepts are structured because our concepts present it that way, and our concepts present it that way because of predispositions that are substantively innate. The Protoconcept Hypothesis holds that such protoconcepts are onto- and phylogenetically prior to concepts, themselves onto- and phylogenetically prior to (proto-)language. If that is right, then an account of language genesis and evolution requires a corresponding account for concepts and an explication of protolanguage assumes an explication of protoconcepts. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
subject
keywords
evolution, productivity, systematicity, Kantian spontaneity, Myth of the Given, innateness, protoconcepts, concepts
in
Theoria et Historia Scientiarum
volume
11
pages
159 - 178
publisher
Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika
ISSN
0867-4159
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e6b806ea-4d23-4489-8bdc-0a55fb9b1363 (old id 4780307)
date added to LUP
2014-11-19 09:15:51
date last changed
2016-04-16 01:37:27
@article{e6b806ea-4d23-4489-8bdc-0a55fb9b1363,
  abstract     = {Fodor is infamous for his radical conceptual nativism, McDowell likewise well-known for suggesting that concepts extend “all the way out” into the world and arguing against what he calls (per Sellars) The Myth of the Given: the idea that non-conceptual percepts justify conceptual frameworks. One need not go so far as either researcher, however, in allowing merit to their arguments. It seems we are predisposed, from the beginning of our lives, to look at the world in certain ways and not others. The world need not be “fully conceptual” to be never entirely free, for the conceptually minded agent, of conceptual taint. It seems structured remarkably like our concepts are structured because our concepts present it that way, and our concepts present it that way because of predispositions that are substantively innate. The Protoconcept Hypothesis holds that such protoconcepts are onto- and phylogenetically prior to concepts, themselves onto- and phylogenetically prior to (proto-)language. If that is right, then an account of language genesis and evolution requires a corresponding account for concepts and an explication of protolanguage assumes an explication of protoconcepts.},
  author       = {Parthemore, Joel},
  issn         = {0867-4159},
  keyword      = {evolution,productivity,systematicity,Kantian spontaneity,Myth of the Given,innateness,protoconcepts,concepts},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {159--178},
  publisher    = {Uniwersytet Mikołaja Kopernika},
  series       = {Theoria et Historia Scientiarum},
  title        = {The case for protoconcepts : Why concepts, language, and protolanguage all need protoconcepts},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2014},
}