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Exploring the mechanical strength of additively manufactured metal structures with embedded electrical materials

Li, J. LU ; Monaghan, T.; Masurtschak, S.; Bournias-Varotsis, A.; Friel, R. J. LU and Harris, R. A. (2015) In Materials Science and Engineering A 639. p.474-481
Abstract

Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) enables the integration of a wide variety of components into solid metal matrices due to the process induced high degree of metal matrix plastic flow at low bulk temperatures. Exploitation of this phenomenon allows the fabrication of previously unobtainable novel engineered metal matrix components.The feasibility of directly embedding electrical materials within UAM metal matrices was investigated in this work. Three different dielectric materials were embedded into UAM fabricated aluminium metal-matrices with, research derived, optimal processing parameters. The effect of the dielectric material hardness on the final metal matrix mechanical strength after UAM processing was investigated... (More)

Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) enables the integration of a wide variety of components into solid metal matrices due to the process induced high degree of metal matrix plastic flow at low bulk temperatures. Exploitation of this phenomenon allows the fabrication of previously unobtainable novel engineered metal matrix components.The feasibility of directly embedding electrical materials within UAM metal matrices was investigated in this work. Three different dielectric materials were embedded into UAM fabricated aluminium metal-matrices with, research derived, optimal processing parameters. The effect of the dielectric material hardness on the final metal matrix mechanical strength after UAM processing was investigated systematically via mechanical peel testing and microscopy. It was found that when the Knoop hardness of the dielectric film was increased from 12.1. HK/0.01. kg to 27.3. HK/0.01. kg, the mechanical peel testing and linear weld density of the bond interface were enhanced by 15% and 16%, respectively, at UAM parameters of 1600. N weld force, 25. μm sonotrode amplitude, and 20. mm/s welding speed. This work uniquely identified that the mechanical strength of dielectric containing UAM metal matrices improved with increasing dielectric material hardness. It was therefore concluded that any UAM metal matrix mechanical strength degradation due to dielectric embedding could be restricted by employing a dielectric material with a suitable hardness (larger than 20. HK/0.01. kg). This result is of great interest and a vital step for realising electronic containing multifunctional smart metal composites for future industrial applications.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
3D printing, Aluminium, Embedded electrical materials, Layered manufacturing, Mechanical strength, Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing
in
Materials Science and Engineering A
volume
639
pages
8 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84930653795
ISSN
0921-5093
DOI
10.1016/j.msea.2015.05.019
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e6c16a39-c2ea-4e50-90ef-cd8e3cbc1d67
date added to LUP
2017-01-23 09:48:29
date last changed
2017-10-29 04:56:55
@article{e6c16a39-c2ea-4e50-90ef-cd8e3cbc1d67,
  abstract     = {<p>Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing (UAM) enables the integration of a wide variety of components into solid metal matrices due to the process induced high degree of metal matrix plastic flow at low bulk temperatures. Exploitation of this phenomenon allows the fabrication of previously unobtainable novel engineered metal matrix components.The feasibility of directly embedding electrical materials within UAM metal matrices was investigated in this work. Three different dielectric materials were embedded into UAM fabricated aluminium metal-matrices with, research derived, optimal processing parameters. The effect of the dielectric material hardness on the final metal matrix mechanical strength after UAM processing was investigated systematically via mechanical peel testing and microscopy. It was found that when the Knoop hardness of the dielectric film was increased from 12.1. HK/0.01. kg to 27.3. HK/0.01. kg, the mechanical peel testing and linear weld density of the bond interface were enhanced by 15% and 16%, respectively, at UAM parameters of 1600. N weld force, 25. μm sonotrode amplitude, and 20. mm/s welding speed. This work uniquely identified that the mechanical strength of dielectric containing UAM metal matrices improved with increasing dielectric material hardness. It was therefore concluded that any UAM metal matrix mechanical strength degradation due to dielectric embedding could be restricted by employing a dielectric material with a suitable hardness (larger than 20. HK/0.01. kg). This result is of great interest and a vital step for realising electronic containing multifunctional smart metal composites for future industrial applications.</p>},
  author       = {Li, J. and Monaghan, T. and Masurtschak, S. and Bournias-Varotsis, A. and Friel, R. J. and Harris, R. A.},
  issn         = {0921-5093},
  keyword      = {3D printing,Aluminium,Embedded electrical materials,Layered manufacturing,Mechanical strength,Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {474--481},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = { Materials Science and Engineering A},
  title        = {Exploring the mechanical strength of additively manufactured metal structures with embedded electrical materials},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.msea.2015.05.019},
  volume       = {639},
  year         = {2015},
}