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Meaning redefined : Reflections on the scholastic heritage conveyed by john deely to contemporary semiotics

Sonesson, Göran LU (2018) In American Journal of Semiotics 34(1-2). p.65-86
Abstract

From the point of view of semiotics, the essential contribution of John Deely consists in having made us all aware of the richness of the Scholastic heritage, and to have explained it to us latter-day semioticians. Even for those, who, like the present author, think that semiotics was alive and well between the dawn of the Latin Age, and the rediscovery of Scholastic realism by Peirce, the notions coined by the Scholastic philosophers are intriguing. To make sense of scholastic notions such as ens reale and ens rationis is not a straightforward matter, but it is worthwhile trying to do so, in particular by adapting these notions to ideas more familiar in the present age. Starting out from the notions of Scholastic Realism, we try in the... (More)

From the point of view of semiotics, the essential contribution of John Deely consists in having made us all aware of the richness of the Scholastic heritage, and to have explained it to us latter-day semioticians. Even for those, who, like the present author, think that semiotics was alive and well between the dawn of the Latin Age, and the rediscovery of Scholastic realism by Peirce, the notions coined by the Scholastic philosophers are intriguing. To make sense of scholastic notions such as ens reale and ens rationis is not a straightforward matter, but it is worthwhile trying to do so, in particular by adapting these notions to ideas more familiar in the present age. Starting out from the notions of Scholastic Realism, we try in the following to make sense of the different meanings of meaning, only one of which is the sign. It will be suggested that there are counterparts to ens rationis, not only in the thinking of some contemporary philosophers, but also, in a more convoluted way, in the discussion within cognitive science about different extensions to the mind. The recurrent theme of the paper will be Deely's musing, according to which signs, unlike any other kind of being, form relations which may connect things which are mind-dependent (ens rationis) and mind-independent (ens reale). The import of this proposition is quite different if is applied to what we will call the Augustinian notion of the sign, or to the Fonseca notion, which is better termed intentionality. In both cases, however, mind-dependence will be shown to have a fundamental part to play. Following upon the redefinition of Medieval philosophy suggested by Deely, we will broach a redefinition of something even wider: meaning even beyond signs.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Deely, Externalism, Mind-dependent being, Scholastiticm, Semiosis, Sign
in
American Journal of Semiotics
volume
34
issue
1-2
pages
22 pages
publisher
Philosophy Documentation Center
external identifiers
  • scopus:85054306437
ISSN
0277-7126
DOI
10.5840/ajs201851436
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e6fafbd6-bb71-4e20-8bb5-eeeec2496ab6
date added to LUP
2018-11-08 09:04:19
date last changed
2019-11-20 05:30:19
@article{e6fafbd6-bb71-4e20-8bb5-eeeec2496ab6,
  abstract     = {<p>From the point of view of semiotics, the essential contribution of John Deely consists in having made us all aware of the richness of the Scholastic heritage, and to have explained it to us latter-day semioticians. Even for those, who, like the present author, think that semiotics was alive and well between the dawn of the Latin Age, and the rediscovery of Scholastic realism by Peirce, the notions coined by the Scholastic philosophers are intriguing. To make sense of scholastic notions such as ens reale and ens rationis is not a straightforward matter, but it is worthwhile trying to do so, in particular by adapting these notions to ideas more familiar in the present age. Starting out from the notions of Scholastic Realism, we try in the following to make sense of the different meanings of meaning, only one of which is the sign. It will be suggested that there are counterparts to ens rationis, not only in the thinking of some contemporary philosophers, but also, in a more convoluted way, in the discussion within cognitive science about different extensions to the mind. The recurrent theme of the paper will be Deely's musing, according to which signs, unlike any other kind of being, form relations which may connect things which are mind-dependent (ens rationis) and mind-independent (ens reale). The import of this proposition is quite different if is applied to what we will call the Augustinian notion of the sign, or to the Fonseca notion, which is better termed intentionality. In both cases, however, mind-dependence will be shown to have a fundamental part to play. Following upon the redefinition of Medieval philosophy suggested by Deely, we will broach a redefinition of something even wider: meaning even beyond signs.</p>},
  author       = {Sonesson, Göran},
  issn         = {0277-7126},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {65--86},
  publisher    = {Philosophy Documentation Center},
  series       = {American Journal of Semiotics},
  title        = {Meaning redefined : Reflections on the scholastic heritage conveyed by john deely to contemporary semiotics},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.5840/ajs201851436},
  doi          = {10.5840/ajs201851436},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2018},
}