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Medical risk factors for small-bowel adenocarcinoma with focus on Crohn disease : A European population-based case-control study

Kaerlev, L. ; Teglbjærg, P. S. ; Sabroe, S. ; Kolstad, H. A. ; Ahrens, W. ; Eriksson, M. LU ; Guénel, P. ; Hardell, L. ; Launoy, G. and Merler, E. , et al. (2001) In Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology 36(6). p.641-646
Abstract

Background: Crohn disease and biliary diseases have been associated with small-bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). We examined how medical conditions affect the risk of SBA. Methods: A population-based European multicentre case-control study during the period 1995-97 including 95 histologically verified cases of SBA along with 3335 population controls; 70 cases (74%) and 2070 (62%) controls were interviewed about previous medical conditions. Results: Crohn disease was identified in two SBA cases (both located in ileum) and two controls; odds ratio (OR) 53.6 (6.0-477) (95% CI in parentheses). Only one case and no controls had had long-standing Crohn disease. Coeliac disease was associated with SBA (2 cases, 0 controls), but one of the cases was... (More)

Background: Crohn disease and biliary diseases have been associated with small-bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). We examined how medical conditions affect the risk of SBA. Methods: A population-based European multicentre case-control study during the period 1995-97 including 95 histologically verified cases of SBA along with 3335 population controls; 70 cases (74%) and 2070 (62%) controls were interviewed about previous medical conditions. Results: Crohn disease was identified in two SBA cases (both located in ileum) and two controls; odds ratio (OR) 53.6 (6.0-477) (95% CI in parentheses). Only one case and no controls had had long-standing Crohn disease. Coeliac disease was associated with SBA (2 cases, 0 controls), but one of the cases was diagnosed at the same time as the SBA. Overall, people with a history of gallstones had no increased risk of SBA. The OR was exclusively increased during the 3-year period preceding the SBA diagnosis. Previous gallstone surgery, which may be a sign of severe gallstone disease, was not associated with SBA. Liver cirrhosis, hepatitis or medical treatments with radioactive substances or corticosteroid tablets were not associated with this disease. Cases with SBA had an increased prevalence of anaemia; OR 15.3 (2.5-92.1). An association between low educational level and SBA was found; OR 1.75 (1.0-3.0). Conclusion: This study supports Crohn disease and coeliac disease being strong but rare risk factors for SBA. Previous gallstones were unrelated to SBA, and detection bias may account for the findings in earlier studies.

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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Adenocarcinoma, Case-control studies, Crohn disease, Epidemiology, Small intestine
in
Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
volume
36
issue
6
pages
641 - 646
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035004211
  • pmid:11424324
ISSN
0036-5521
DOI
10.1080/00365520118247
language
English
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no
id
e7c3e350-785c-462a-ab9a-e1a38a15985f
date added to LUP
2020-02-21 16:41:13
date last changed
2020-02-22 01:57:45
@article{e7c3e350-785c-462a-ab9a-e1a38a15985f,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Crohn disease and biliary diseases have been associated with small-bowel adenocarcinoma (SBA). We examined how medical conditions affect the risk of SBA. Methods: A population-based European multicentre case-control study during the period 1995-97 including 95 histologically verified cases of SBA along with 3335 population controls; 70 cases (74%) and 2070 (62%) controls were interviewed about previous medical conditions. Results: Crohn disease was identified in two SBA cases (both located in ileum) and two controls; odds ratio (OR) 53.6 (6.0-477) (95% CI in parentheses). Only one case and no controls had had long-standing Crohn disease. Coeliac disease was associated with SBA (2 cases, 0 controls), but one of the cases was diagnosed at the same time as the SBA. Overall, people with a history of gallstones had no increased risk of SBA. The OR was exclusively increased during the 3-year period preceding the SBA diagnosis. Previous gallstone surgery, which may be a sign of severe gallstone disease, was not associated with SBA. Liver cirrhosis, hepatitis or medical treatments with radioactive substances or corticosteroid tablets were not associated with this disease. Cases with SBA had an increased prevalence of anaemia; OR 15.3 (2.5-92.1). An association between low educational level and SBA was found; OR 1.75 (1.0-3.0). Conclusion: This study supports Crohn disease and coeliac disease being strong but rare risk factors for SBA. Previous gallstones were unrelated to SBA, and detection bias may account for the findings in earlier studies.</p>},
  author       = {Kaerlev, L. and Teglbjærg, P. S. and Sabroe, S. and Kolstad, H. A. and Ahrens, W. and Eriksson, M. and Guénel, P. and Hardell, L. and Launoy, G. and Merler, E. and Merletti, F. and Stang, A.},
  issn         = {0036-5521},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {641--646},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology},
  title        = {Medical risk factors for small-bowel adenocarcinoma with focus on Crohn disease : A European population-based case-control study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365520118247},
  doi          = {10.1080/00365520118247},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2001},
}