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Heparin-binding protein (HBP): an early marker of respiratory failure after trauma?

Johansson, J.; Brattstrom, O.; Sjoberg, F.; Lindbom, L.; Herwald, Heiko LU ; Weitzberg, E. and Oldner, A. (2013) In Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica 57(5). p.580-586
Abstract
Background Trauma and its complications contribute to morbidity and mortality in the general population. Trauma victims are susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) are activated after trauma and there is substantial evidence of their involvement in the development of ARDS. Activated PMNs release heparin-binding protein (HBP), a granule protein previously shown to be involved in acute inflammatory reactions. We hypothesised that there is an increase in plasma HBP content after trauma and that the increased levels are related to the severity of the trauma or later development of severe sepsis and organ failure (ARDS). Methods and Material We investigated HBP in plasma samples... (More)
Background Trauma and its complications contribute to morbidity and mortality in the general population. Trauma victims are susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) are activated after trauma and there is substantial evidence of their involvement in the development of ARDS. Activated PMNs release heparin-binding protein (HBP), a granule protein previously shown to be involved in acute inflammatory reactions. We hypothesised that there is an increase in plasma HBP content after trauma and that the increased levels are related to the severity of the trauma or later development of severe sepsis and organ failure (ARDS). Methods and Material We investigated HBP in plasma samples within 36h from trauma in 47 patients admitted to a level one trauma centre with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 26 (2134). ISS, admission sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were recorded at admission. ARDS and presence of severe sepsis were determined daily during intensive care. Results We found no correlation between individual maximal plasma HBP levels at admission and ISS, admission SOFA or APACHE II. We found, however, a correlation between HBP levels and development of ARDS (P=0.026, n=47), but not to severe sepsis. Conclusion HBP is a potential biomarker candidate for early detection of ARDS development after trauma. Further research is required to confirm a casual relationship between plasma HBP and the development of ARDS. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica
volume
57
issue
5
pages
580 - 586
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000317432300006
  • scopus:84876294294
ISSN
0001-5172
DOI
10.1111/aas.12070
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e82a889d-38b4-45f1-afab-2fd3318f1088 (old id 3738897)
date added to LUP
2013-06-03 08:31:08
date last changed
2019-03-27 01:16:10
@article{e82a889d-38b4-45f1-afab-2fd3318f1088,
  abstract     = {Background Trauma and its complications contribute to morbidity and mortality in the general population. Trauma victims are susceptible to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and sepsis. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs) are activated after trauma and there is substantial evidence of their involvement in the development of ARDS. Activated PMNs release heparin-binding protein (HBP), a granule protein previously shown to be involved in acute inflammatory reactions. We hypothesised that there is an increase in plasma HBP content after trauma and that the increased levels are related to the severity of the trauma or later development of severe sepsis and organ failure (ARDS). Methods and Material We investigated HBP in plasma samples within 36h from trauma in 47 patients admitted to a level one trauma centre with a mean injury severity score (ISS) of 26 (2134). ISS, admission sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II scores were recorded at admission. ARDS and presence of severe sepsis were determined daily during intensive care. Results We found no correlation between individual maximal plasma HBP levels at admission and ISS, admission SOFA or APACHE II. We found, however, a correlation between HBP levels and development of ARDS (P=0.026, n=47), but not to severe sepsis. Conclusion HBP is a potential biomarker candidate for early detection of ARDS development after trauma. Further research is required to confirm a casual relationship between plasma HBP and the development of ARDS.},
  author       = {Johansson, J. and Brattstrom, O. and Sjoberg, F. and Lindbom, L. and Herwald, Heiko and Weitzberg, E. and Oldner, A.},
  issn         = {0001-5172},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {580--586},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Heparin-binding protein (HBP): an early marker of respiratory failure after trauma?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/aas.12070},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2013},
}