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Network analysis of skin tumor progression identifies a rewired genetic architecture affecting inflammation and tumor susceptibility

Quigley, David A; To, Minh D; Kim, Il Jin; Lin, Kevin K; Albertson, Donna G; Sjölund, Jonas LU ; Pérez-Losada, Jesús and Balmain, Allan (2011) In Genome Biology 12(1). p.5-5
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Germline polymorphisms can influence gene expression networks in normal mammalian tissues and can affect disease susceptibility. We and others have shown that analysis of this genetic architecture can identify single genes and whole pathways that influence complex traits, including inflammation and cancer susceptibility. Whether germline variants affect gene expression in tumors that have undergone somatic alterations, and the extent to which these variants influence tumor progression, is unknown.

RESULTS: Using an integrated linkage and genomic analysis of a mouse model of skin cancer that produces both benign tumors and malignant carcinomas, we document major changes in germline control of gene expression during skin... (More)

BACKGROUND: Germline polymorphisms can influence gene expression networks in normal mammalian tissues and can affect disease susceptibility. We and others have shown that analysis of this genetic architecture can identify single genes and whole pathways that influence complex traits, including inflammation and cancer susceptibility. Whether germline variants affect gene expression in tumors that have undergone somatic alterations, and the extent to which these variants influence tumor progression, is unknown.

RESULTS: Using an integrated linkage and genomic analysis of a mouse model of skin cancer that produces both benign tumors and malignant carcinomas, we document major changes in germline control of gene expression during skin tumor development resulting from cell selection, somatic genetic events, and changes in the tumor microenvironment. The number of significant expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) is progressively reduced in benign and malignant skin tumors when compared to normal skin. However, novel tumor-specific eQTL are detected for several genes associated with tumor susceptibility, including IL18 (Il18), Granzyme E (Gzme), Sprouty homolog 2 (Spry2), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (Map2k4).

CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the genetic architecture is substantially altered in tumors, and that eQTL analysis of tumors can identify host factors that influence the tumor microenvironment, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling, and cancer susceptibility.

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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Animals, Biomarkers, Tumor, Cell Transformation, Neoplastic, Comparative Genomic Hybridization, Disease Progression, Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic, Gene Regulatory Networks, Genetic Predisposition to Disease, Inflammation, Mice, Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases, Polymorphism, Genetic, Quantitative Trait Loci, Signal Transduction, Skin Neoplasms
in
Genome Biology
volume
12
issue
1
pages
5 - 5
publisher
BioMed Central
external identifiers
  • scopus:78651453837
ISSN
1474-7596
DOI
10.1186/gb-2011-12-1-r5
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e84a93a2-9561-4cba-b6d4-35ff16f3acad
date added to LUP
2016-09-08 12:40:48
date last changed
2017-07-30 05:14:32
@article{e84a93a2-9561-4cba-b6d4-35ff16f3acad,
  abstract     = {<p>BACKGROUND: Germline polymorphisms can influence gene expression networks in normal mammalian tissues and can affect disease susceptibility. We and others have shown that analysis of this genetic architecture can identify single genes and whole pathways that influence complex traits, including inflammation and cancer susceptibility. Whether germline variants affect gene expression in tumors that have undergone somatic alterations, and the extent to which these variants influence tumor progression, is unknown.</p><p>RESULTS: Using an integrated linkage and genomic analysis of a mouse model of skin cancer that produces both benign tumors and malignant carcinomas, we document major changes in germline control of gene expression during skin tumor development resulting from cell selection, somatic genetic events, and changes in the tumor microenvironment. The number of significant expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) is progressively reduced in benign and malignant skin tumors when compared to normal skin. However, novel tumor-specific eQTL are detected for several genes associated with tumor susceptibility, including IL18 (Il18), Granzyme E (Gzme), Sprouty homolog 2 (Spry2), and Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 4 (Map2k4).</p><p>CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that the genetic architecture is substantially altered in tumors, and that eQTL analysis of tumors can identify host factors that influence the tumor microenvironment, mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling, and cancer susceptibility.</p>},
  author       = {Quigley, David A and To, Minh D and Kim, Il Jin and Lin, Kevin K and Albertson, Donna G and Sjölund, Jonas and Pérez-Losada, Jesús and Balmain, Allan},
  issn         = {1474-7596},
  keyword      = {Animals,Biomarkers, Tumor,Cell Transformation, Neoplastic,Comparative Genomic Hybridization,Disease Progression,Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic,Gene Regulatory Networks,Genetic Predisposition to Disease,Inflammation,Mice,Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases,Polymorphism, Genetic,Quantitative Trait Loci,Signal Transduction,Skin Neoplasms},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {5--5},
  publisher    = {BioMed Central},
  series       = {Genome Biology},
  title        = {Network analysis of skin tumor progression identifies a rewired genetic architecture affecting inflammation and tumor susceptibility},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/gb-2011-12-1-r5},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2011},
}