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Club cell secretory protein (CC16) in gastric fluid at birth and subsequent lung disease in preterm infants

Hagman, Cecilia LU ; Björklund, Lars J. LU ; Hellgren, Gunnel; Tufvesson, Ellen LU and Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid LU (2018) In Pediatric Pulmonology 53(10). p.1399-1406
Abstract

Background: Club cell secretory protein (CC16) probably has a role in protecting the lung from inflammation. Aim: To evaluate if low levels of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth, reflecting low levels of CC16 in the lung, would be associated with lung inflammation and respiratory morbidity. Methods: A study of 64 infants with mean gestational age 26.1 weeks. CC16 was analyzed in gastric fluid at birth. CC16, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and MMP-9 were analyzed in tracheal aspirate within 24 h from birth. Results: CC16 in gastric fluid increased with gestational age (P = 0.033). Lower concentrations of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth were associated with higher concentrations of IL-1β (P = 0.028), TNF-α (P = 0.034), and MMP-9 (P = 0.015) in... (More)

Background: Club cell secretory protein (CC16) probably has a role in protecting the lung from inflammation. Aim: To evaluate if low levels of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth, reflecting low levels of CC16 in the lung, would be associated with lung inflammation and respiratory morbidity. Methods: A study of 64 infants with mean gestational age 26.1 weeks. CC16 was analyzed in gastric fluid at birth. CC16, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and MMP-9 were analyzed in tracheal aspirate within 24 h from birth. Results: CC16 in gastric fluid increased with gestational age (P = 0.033). Lower concentrations of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth were associated with higher concentrations of IL-1β (P = 0.028), TNF-α (P = 0.034), and MMP-9 (P = 0.015) in tracheal aspirate. Infants who needed mechanical ventilation at 24 and 72 h of age had lower CC16 in gastric fluid than those not ventilated at these ages (P = 0.011 and P = 0.024, respectively). Lower CC16 in gastric fluid was associated with higher FiO2 at 6 h (P = 0.009), higher PaCO2 at 24 h (P = 0.03), more ventilator days (P = 0.012) and more days with supplemental oxygen (P = 0.03). Infants who had either died or were still treated with supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age had lower CC16 in gastric fluid than infants with none of these outcomes (P = 0.049). Conclusion: A low CC16 concentration in gastric fluid at birth was associated with increased inflammation in the trachea within the first 24 h of life and with more need for respiratory support in the neonatal period.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
CC16 protein, cytokines, human, inflammation, lung diseases, preterm birth
in
Pediatric Pulmonology
volume
53
issue
10
pages
8 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85050641971
ISSN
8755-6863
DOI
10.1002/ppul.24128
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e85b8250-f135-476d-b7ec-bd59a678a79d
date added to LUP
2018-09-27 15:57:21
date last changed
2019-11-05 05:02:30
@article{e85b8250-f135-476d-b7ec-bd59a678a79d,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Club cell secretory protein (CC16) probably has a role in protecting the lung from inflammation. Aim: To evaluate if low levels of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth, reflecting low levels of CC16 in the lung, would be associated with lung inflammation and respiratory morbidity. Methods: A study of 64 infants with mean gestational age 26.1 weeks. CC16 was analyzed in gastric fluid at birth. CC16, pro-inflammatory cytokines, and MMP-9 were analyzed in tracheal aspirate within 24 h from birth. Results: CC16 in gastric fluid increased with gestational age (P = 0.033). Lower concentrations of CC16 in gastric fluid at birth were associated with higher concentrations of IL-1β (P = 0.028), TNF-α (P = 0.034), and MMP-9 (P = 0.015) in tracheal aspirate. Infants who needed mechanical ventilation at 24 and 72 h of age had lower CC16 in gastric fluid than those not ventilated at these ages (P = 0.011 and P = 0.024, respectively). Lower CC16 in gastric fluid was associated with higher FiO<sub>2</sub> at 6 h (P = 0.009), higher PaCO<sub>2</sub> at 24 h (P = 0.03), more ventilator days (P = 0.012) and more days with supplemental oxygen (P = 0.03). Infants who had either died or were still treated with supplemental oxygen at 36 weeks postmenstrual age had lower CC16 in gastric fluid than infants with none of these outcomes (P = 0.049). Conclusion: A low CC16 concentration in gastric fluid at birth was associated with increased inflammation in the trachea within the first 24 h of life and with more need for respiratory support in the neonatal period.</p>},
  author       = {Hagman, Cecilia and Björklund, Lars J. and Hellgren, Gunnel and Tufvesson, Ellen and Hansen-Pupp, Ingrid},
  issn         = {8755-6863},
  keyword      = {CC16 protein,cytokines,human,inflammation,lung diseases,preterm birth},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {1399--1406},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Pediatric Pulmonology},
  title        = {Club cell secretory protein (CC16) in gastric fluid at birth and subsequent lung disease in preterm infants},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24128},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2018},
}