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Implementation of Service Routes in the United States.

Ståhl, Agneta LU ; McLary, J and Persich, S (1993) In Transportation Research Board Annual Proceeding 1378. p.21-28
Abstract
The passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)
signified a new era of mobility for elderly and disabled passengers.
There have been many debates about fixed-route versus door-todoor
demand-responsive services. While the United States has
been discussing the issue, Sweden has been experimenting since
1983 with a concept called service routes. Madison Metro (in
Wiscon_sin) is very close (April 1992) to implementing the first
two service routes in the United States. The planning activities
leading up to implementation and, subject to availability, preliminary
results are discussed. The service-route concept and the
unique planning consideration necessary to design successful... (More)
The passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)
signified a new era of mobility for elderly and disabled passengers.
There have been many debates about fixed-route versus door-todoor
demand-responsive services. While the United States has
been discussing the issue, Sweden has been experimenting since
1983 with a concept called service routes. Madison Metro (in
Wiscon_sin) is very close (April 1992) to implementing the first
two service routes in the United States. The planning activities
leading up to implementation and, subject to availability, preliminary
results are discussed. The service-route concept and the
unique planning consideration necessary to design successful routes
is reviewed, as are the process used in defining desirable origins
and destinations, the public participation process, the development
of alternatives, the refinement of alternatives, and the selection
of routing details. In addition, the discussion will include
detailing of operating guidelines (i.e., driver selection/training
and fares), the integration with other Metro service including
Metro+ Plus, the estimation of demand, the development of costs
and revenues, and finally the establishment of a monitoring and
evaluation plan. This concept when applied to small cities or
selected small communities within a larger urban area has the
potential to satisfy ADA requirements with a small capital investment
and potentially lower operating costs. The addition of
minivans with low floors and ramps could provide the door-todoor
service needed by a minority of users. Most important, this
design can provide significantly better mobility and flexibility for
the transportation-disadvantaged residents of our communities. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
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in
Transportation Research Board Annual Proceeding
volume
1378
pages
21 - 28
publisher
Transportation Research Board, Washington DC, USA
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8b951e8-7a12-487f-ae88-560220547f2e
alternative location
https://trid.trb.org/view/377774
date added to LUP
2018-06-17 20:20:25
date last changed
2018-06-19 11:59:54
@article{e8b951e8-7a12-487f-ae88-560220547f2e,
  abstract     = {The passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA)<br/>signified a new era of mobility for elderly and disabled passengers.<br/>There have been many debates about fixed-route versus door-todoor<br/>demand-responsive services. While the United States has<br/>been discussing the issue, Sweden has been experimenting since<br/>1983 with a concept called service routes. Madison Metro (in<br/>Wiscon_sin) is very close (April 1992) to implementing the first<br/>two service routes in the United States. The planning activities<br/>leading up to implementation and, subject to availability, preliminary<br/>results are discussed. The service-route concept and the<br/>unique planning consideration necessary to design successful routes<br/>is reviewed, as are the process used in defining desirable origins<br/>and destinations, the public participation process, the development<br/>of alternatives, the refinement of alternatives, and the selection<br/>of routing details. In addition, the discussion will include<br/>detailing of operating guidelines (i.e., driver selection/training<br/>and fares), the integration with other Metro service including<br/>Metro+ Plus, the estimation of demand, the development of costs<br/>and revenues, and finally the establishment of a monitoring and<br/>evaluation plan. This concept when applied to small cities or<br/>selected small communities within a larger urban area has the<br/>potential to satisfy ADA requirements with a small capital investment<br/>and potentially lower operating costs. The addition of<br/>minivans with low floors and ramps could provide the door-todoor<br/>service needed by a minority of users. Most important, this<br/>design can provide significantly better mobility and flexibility for<br/>the transportation-disadvantaged residents of our communities. },
  author       = {Ståhl, Agneta and McLary, J and Persich, S},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {21--28},
  publisher    = {Transportation Research Board, Washington DC, USA},
  series       = {Transportation Research Board Annual Proceeding},
  title        = {Implementation of Service Routes in the United States.},
  volume       = {1378},
  year         = {1993},
}