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Synergistic and species-specific effects of climate change and water colour on cyanobacterial toxicity and bloom formation

Ekvall, Mattias LU ; Martin, Javier de la Calle; Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Gustafsson, Susanne LU ; Lurling, Miquel and Hansson, Lars-Anders LU (2013) In Freshwater Biology 58(11). p.2414-2422
Abstract
Cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide phenomenon in both marine and freshwater ecosystems and are predicted to occur more frequently due to global climate change. However, our future water resources may also simultaneously suffer from other environmental threats such as elevated amounts of humic content and consequent increased water colour, a phenomenon called brownification'. In order to investigate the effects of temperature and water colour in combination, we performed a mesocosm experiment combining a 3 degrees C increase in temperature and a doubling in water colour. With this, we created a projected future scenario for our water resources, and we specifically focused on how these changes would affect cyanobacterial bloom formation... (More)
Cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide phenomenon in both marine and freshwater ecosystems and are predicted to occur more frequently due to global climate change. However, our future water resources may also simultaneously suffer from other environmental threats such as elevated amounts of humic content and consequent increased water colour, a phenomenon called brownification'. In order to investigate the effects of temperature and water colour in combination, we performed a mesocosm experiment combining a 3 degrees C increase in temperature and a doubling in water colour. With this, we created a projected future scenario for our water resources, and we specifically focused on how these changes would affect cyanobacterial bloom formation and toxicity. We showed that despite total cyanobacterial biomass remaining unaffected, the abundance of one individual cyanobacterial species, Microcystis botrys, increased in response to the combination of elevated temperature and increased water colour. Furthermore, population fluctuations in M.botrys explained the majority of the variations in microcystin concentrations, suggesting that this species was responsible for the more than 300% higher microcystin concentrations in the future scenario treatment compared to the ambient scenario. Hence, it was not a change in cyanobacterial biomass, but rather a species-specific response that had the most profound impact on bloom toxicity. We argue that understanding such species-specific responses to multiple stressors is crucial for proper management decisions because toxic blooms can significantly affect both biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, as well as ecosystem services such as drinking water supply and recreation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
climate change, cyanobacteria, microcystin, temperature, water colour, water quality
in
Freshwater Biology
volume
58
issue
11
pages
2414 - 2422
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000325156400018
  • scopus:84884912731
ISSN
0046-5070
DOI
10.1111/fwb.12220
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e9930f12-fe54-42b2-a3c8-91087384c86d (old id 4171781)
date added to LUP
2013-11-26 14:49:53
date last changed
2019-05-12 03:45:57
@article{e9930f12-fe54-42b2-a3c8-91087384c86d,
  abstract     = {Cyanobacterial blooms are a worldwide phenomenon in both marine and freshwater ecosystems and are predicted to occur more frequently due to global climate change. However, our future water resources may also simultaneously suffer from other environmental threats such as elevated amounts of humic content and consequent increased water colour, a phenomenon called brownification'. In order to investigate the effects of temperature and water colour in combination, we performed a mesocosm experiment combining a 3 degrees C increase in temperature and a doubling in water colour. With this, we created a projected future scenario for our water resources, and we specifically focused on how these changes would affect cyanobacterial bloom formation and toxicity. We showed that despite total cyanobacterial biomass remaining unaffected, the abundance of one individual cyanobacterial species, Microcystis botrys, increased in response to the combination of elevated temperature and increased water colour. Furthermore, population fluctuations in M.botrys explained the majority of the variations in microcystin concentrations, suggesting that this species was responsible for the more than 300% higher microcystin concentrations in the future scenario treatment compared to the ambient scenario. Hence, it was not a change in cyanobacterial biomass, but rather a species-specific response that had the most profound impact on bloom toxicity. We argue that understanding such species-specific responses to multiple stressors is crucial for proper management decisions because toxic blooms can significantly affect both biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, as well as ecosystem services such as drinking water supply and recreation.},
  author       = {Ekvall, Mattias and Martin, Javier de la Calle and Faassen, Elisabeth J. and Gustafsson, Susanne and Lurling, Miquel and Hansson, Lars-Anders},
  issn         = {0046-5070},
  keyword      = {climate change,cyanobacteria,microcystin,temperature,water colour,water quality},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {2414--2422},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Freshwater Biology},
  title        = {Synergistic and species-specific effects of climate change and water colour on cyanobacterial toxicity and bloom formation},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/fwb.12220},
  volume       = {58},
  year         = {2013},
}