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When disaster strikes, acute stress disorder may follow

Koopman, Cheryl; Classen, Catherine C; Cardeña, Etzel LU and Spiegel, David (1995) In Journal of Traumatic Stress 8(1). p.29-29
Abstract
During and immediately following a traumatic event, people may manifest a pattern of dissociative and anxiety symptoms and other reactions, referred to as Acute Stress Disorder. A review of the empirical literature on psychological reactions to trauma suggest that this pattern of symptoms has often been identified across different kinds of traumatic events. It is likely to constitute a psychological adaptation to a stressful event, limiting painful thoughts and feelings associated with the event and allowing the person to function at least minimally. Continuation of these symptoms, however, may impair the person's quality of life and disrupt social and other functioning. If symptoms last beyond a month following the traumatic event, Post... (More)
During and immediately following a traumatic event, people may manifest a pattern of dissociative and anxiety symptoms and other reactions, referred to as Acute Stress Disorder. A review of the empirical literature on psychological reactions to trauma suggest that this pattern of symptoms has often been identified across different kinds of traumatic events. It is likely to constitute a psychological adaptation to a stressful event, limiting painful thoughts and feelings associated with the event and allowing the person to function at least minimally. Continuation of these symptoms, however, may impair the person's quality of life and disrupt social and other functioning. If symptoms last beyond a month following the traumatic event, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may ensue, continuing for months or even years after the precipitating event. Hence, it is important to be able to identify this pattern of reactions that may be manifested in reaction to trauma, so that appropriate intervention can be provided. Although it was not officially recognized in the 3rd edition Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-III-R), Acute Stress Disorder is included as a separate diagnosis in the DSM-IV.
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
disaster, trauma, acute stress disorder
in
Journal of Traumatic Stress
volume
8
issue
1
pages
46 pages
publisher
John Wiley and Sons Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:0028833988
ISSN
0894-9867
DOI
10.1007/BF02105405
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
e99f18fb-d205-4387-a655-0710ff7eebae
date added to LUP
2017-05-04 10:37:55
date last changed
2017-11-14 09:50:21
@article{e99f18fb-d205-4387-a655-0710ff7eebae,
  abstract     = {During and immediately following a traumatic event, people may manifest a pattern of dissociative and anxiety symptoms and other reactions, referred to as Acute Stress Disorder. A review of the empirical literature on psychological reactions to trauma suggest that this pattern of symptoms has often been identified across different kinds of traumatic events. It is likely to constitute a psychological adaptation to a stressful event, limiting painful thoughts and feelings associated with the event and allowing the person to function at least minimally. Continuation of these symptoms, however, may impair the person's quality of life and disrupt social and other functioning. If symptoms last beyond a month following the traumatic event, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) may ensue, continuing for months or even years after the precipitating event. Hence, it is important to be able to identify this pattern of reactions that may be manifested in reaction to trauma, so that appropriate intervention can be provided. Although it was not officially recognized in the 3rd edition Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-III-R), Acute Stress Disorder is included as a separate diagnosis in the DSM-IV. <br/>},
  author       = {Koopman, Cheryl and Classen, Catherine C and Cardeña, Etzel and Spiegel, David},
  issn         = {0894-9867},
  keyword      = {disaster,trauma,acute stress disorder},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {29--29},
  publisher    = {John Wiley and Sons Inc.},
  series       = {Journal of Traumatic Stress},
  title        = {When disaster strikes, acute stress disorder may follow},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02105405},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {1995},
}