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Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light concentration in motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia predicts survival

Skillbäck, Tobias; Mattsson, Niklas LU ; Blennow, Kaj LU and Zetterberg, Henrik LU (2017) In Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration 18(5-6). p.397-403
Abstract

Objective: To aid diagnostics, patient stratification and studies seeking to find treatments for the related diseases motor neuron disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), there is a need to establish a way to assess disease severity and the amount of ongoing neurodegeneration. Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) may serve this purpose. Methods: We cross-referenced the Swedish mortality registry with the laboratory database at Sahlgrenska University Hospital to produce a dataset of CSF NFL concentrations and mortality information for 715 MND patients, 87 FTD patients, and 107 healthy controls. Biomarker concentrations were analysed in relation to recorded cause of death and... (More)

Objective: To aid diagnostics, patient stratification and studies seeking to find treatments for the related diseases motor neuron disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), there is a need to establish a way to assess disease severity and the amount of ongoing neurodegeneration. Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) may serve this purpose. Methods: We cross-referenced the Swedish mortality registry with the laboratory database at Sahlgrenska University Hospital to produce a dataset of CSF NFL concentrations and mortality information for 715 MND patients, 87 FTD patients, and 107 healthy controls. Biomarker concentrations were analysed in relation to recorded cause of death and time of death. Results: MND patients had significantly higher CSF NFL concentrations than FTD patients. Both groups had significantly higher concentrations than the healthy controls (mean 709% increase in MND and 307% increase in FTD). Higher concentrations of CSF NFL were associated with shorter survival in both MND and FTD. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the notion of CSF NFL as a useful tool for determining disease intensity in MND and FTD patients. Further studies in patient cohorts with clinically subtyped and genetically classified diagnoses are needed.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Biomarkers in CSF, frontotemporal dementia, motor neuron disease, neurofilament light protein
in
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
volume
18
issue
5-6
pages
397 - 403
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • scopus:85011866920
  • wos:000405584600010
ISSN
2167-8421
DOI
10.1080/21678421.2017.1281962
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ea5ded2e-fd9e-439a-8252-da392bebadce
date added to LUP
2017-02-27 14:37:47
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:52:57
@article{ea5ded2e-fd9e-439a-8252-da392bebadce,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: To aid diagnostics, patient stratification and studies seeking to find treatments for the related diseases motor neuron disease (MND) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), there is a need to establish a way to assess disease severity and the amount of ongoing neurodegeneration. Previous studies have suggested that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament light (NFL) may serve this purpose. Methods: We cross-referenced the Swedish mortality registry with the laboratory database at Sahlgrenska University Hospital to produce a dataset of CSF NFL concentrations and mortality information for 715 MND patients, 87 FTD patients, and 107 healthy controls. Biomarker concentrations were analysed in relation to recorded cause of death and time of death. Results: MND patients had significantly higher CSF NFL concentrations than FTD patients. Both groups had significantly higher concentrations than the healthy controls (mean 709% increase in MND and 307% increase in FTD). Higher concentrations of CSF NFL were associated with shorter survival in both MND and FTD. Conclusions: The results of this study strengthen the notion of CSF NFL as a useful tool for determining disease intensity in MND and FTD patients. Further studies in patient cohorts with clinically subtyped and genetically classified diagnoses are needed.</p>},
  author       = {Skillbäck, Tobias and Mattsson, Niklas and Blennow, Kaj and Zetterberg, Henrik},
  issn         = {2167-8421},
  keyword      = {amyotrophic lateral sclerosis,Biomarkers in CSF,frontotemporal dementia,motor neuron disease,neurofilament light protein},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {5-6},
  pages        = {397--403},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration},
  title        = {Cerebrospinal fluid neurofilament light concentration in motor neuron disease and frontotemporal dementia predicts survival},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/21678421.2017.1281962},
  volume       = {18},
  year         = {2017},
}