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Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation : A cohort study of 1.1 million young men

Andersen, K.; Rasmussen, F. LU ; Neovius, M.; Tynelius, P. and Sundström, J. (2017) In Journal of Internal Medicine
Abstract

Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation. Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation. Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation. Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was... (More)

Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation. Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation. Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation. Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures. Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Atrial fibrillation, Body mass Index, Body surface area, Height, Weight
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85038937679
ISSN
0954-6820
DOI
10.1111/joim.12717
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ebccfbf6-0184-4356-b0c2-f7a11c5a1213
date added to LUP
2018-01-23 13:16:29
date last changed
2018-01-24 03:00:02
@article{ebccfbf6-0184-4356-b0c2-f7a11c5a1213,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Whilst tall stature has been related to lower risk of vascular disease, it has been proposed as a risk factor for atrial fibrillation. Little is known about other anthropometric measures and their joint effects on risk of atrial fibrillation. Objectives: We aim to investigate associations and potential joint effects of height, weight, body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) with risk of atrial fibrillation. Methods: In a cohort covering 1 153 151 18-year-old men participating in the Swedish military conscription (1972-1995), Cox regression was used to investigate associations of height, weight, BSA and BMI with risk of atrial fibrillation. Results: During a median of 26.3 years of follow-up, higher height was associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio [HR] 2.80; 95% CI 2.63-2.98; for 5th vs. 1st quintile) and so was larger BSA (HR 3.05; 95% CI 2.82-3.28; for 5th vs. 1st quintile). Higher weight and BMI were to a lesser extent associated with risk of atrial fibrillation (BMI: 1.42; 95% CI 1.33-1.52, for 5th vs. 1st quintile). We found a multiplicative joint effect of height and weight. Adjusting for muscle strength, exercise capacity and diseases related to atrial fibrillation attenuated these measures. Conclusions: Higher height and weight are strongly associated with higher risk of atrial fibrillation. These associations are multiplicative and independent of each other and are summarized in a strong association of body surface area with risk of atrial fibrillation. The mechanisms remain unknown but may involve increased atrial volume load with larger body size.</p>},
  author       = {Andersen, K. and Rasmussen, F. and Neovius, M. and Tynelius, P. and Sundström, J.},
  issn         = {0954-6820},
  keyword      = {Atrial fibrillation,Body mass Index,Body surface area,Height,Weight},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Body size and risk of atrial fibrillation : A cohort study of 1.1 million young men},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12717},
  year         = {2017},
}