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New method to quantify contribution to aerosol particles from new particle formation : Comparison with traditional method at Vavihill background field station in Sweden

Appavoo, Danielle and Confalone, Kristine (2015)
Abstract
Aerosol particles exist in the atmosphere in large concentrations and have significant global climate effects. New particle formation is an aerosol particle source and, to date, its contribution to the total aerosol concentration in the atmosphere is not fully understood. This study focuses on the extension of new particle formation events that begin in Lille Valby, Denmark and travel over 70 km to Vavihill, Sweden. Data over a five year period (2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2010) was analyzed. Dates selected for analysis had to have a new particle formation event in Lille Valby and be either undefined, have an unclear event, or have a non-event in Vavihill as defined by traditional methods from Dal Maso et al. (2005). The growth rate,... (More)
Aerosol particles exist in the atmosphere in large concentrations and have significant global climate effects. New particle formation is an aerosol particle source and, to date, its contribution to the total aerosol concentration in the atmosphere is not fully understood. This study focuses on the extension of new particle formation events that begin in Lille Valby, Denmark and travel over 70 km to Vavihill, Sweden. Data over a five year period (2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2010) was analyzed. Dates selected for analysis had to have a new particle formation event in Lille Valby and be either undefined, have an unclear event, or have a non-event in Vavihill as defined by traditional methods from Dal Maso et al. (2005). The growth rate, particle size distributions, and wind trajectories at the time of the event were considered when analyzing each event case. 7 out of 1480 days met all of the criteria to be classified as new particle formation extended from Lille Valby. If the result is extrapolated to all wind directions and sources, it is likely that a much higher percentage of the days would meet the criteria. The average percentage of particles in Vavihill that can be attributed to new particle formation from Lille Valby on reclassified days at event times over the five year period considered is 64.18%. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Book/Report
publication status
published
subject
keywords
New particle formation, Vavihill, Lille Valby, Particle number size distribution, classification
editor
Kristensson, Adam LU
pages
23 pages
publisher
Department of Physics, Lund University
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ed65a018-90e8-4569-aa58-8d95473a6417
date added to LUP
2016-10-06 09:30:20
date last changed
2016-10-16 21:31:20
@techreport{ed65a018-90e8-4569-aa58-8d95473a6417,
  abstract     = {Aerosol particles exist in the atmosphere in large concentrations and have significant global climate effects. New particle formation is an aerosol particle source and, to date, its contribution to the total aerosol concentration in the atmosphere is not fully understood. This study focuses on the extension of new particle formation events that begin in Lille Valby, Denmark and travel over 70 km to Vavihill, Sweden. Data over a five year period (2005, 2006, 2008, 2009 and 2010) was analyzed. Dates selected for analysis had to have a new particle formation event in Lille Valby and be either undefined, have an unclear event, or have a non-event in Vavihill as defined by traditional methods from Dal Maso et al. (2005). The growth rate, particle size distributions, and wind trajectories at the time of the event were considered when analyzing each event case. 7 out of 1480 days met all of the criteria to be classified as new particle formation extended from Lille Valby. If the result is extrapolated to all wind directions and sources, it is likely that a much higher percentage of the days would meet the criteria. The average percentage of particles in Vavihill that can be attributed to new particle formation from Lille Valby on reclassified days at event times over the five year period considered is 64.18%.},
  author       = {Appavoo, Danielle and Confalone, Kristine},
  editor       = {Kristensson, Adam},
  institution  = {Department of Physics, Lund University},
  keyword      = {New particle formation,Vavihill,Lille Valby,Particle number size distribution,classification},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  pages        = {23},
  title        = {New method to quantify contribution to aerosol particles from new particle formation : Comparison with traditional method at Vavihill background field station in Sweden},
  year         = {2015},
}