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Effects of Cooling on Ankle Muscle Maximum Performances, Gait Ground Reaction Forces and Electromyography (EMG)

Halder, Amitava LU (2012)
Abstract
Background: Temperature is considered as a significant determinant of skeletal muscle function and also a predisposing factor for muscular mechanical performance. Yet, the effects of local cooling on neuromuscular function and performance during gait remain unexamined.Objectives: To investigate the effects of local cooling on lower leg muscles’ isometric maximal force production, electromyography (EMG) and gait ground reaction force. Methods: Experimental study, within subject design. Sixteen healthy university students, age (mean ± SD) 27.0±2.9 years participated in the study. The local cooling was induced by immersing both lower legs up to knee for 20 min in cold water (10°C) in a climate chamber. Electromyographic (EMG) activities and... (More)
Background: Temperature is considered as a significant determinant of skeletal muscle function and also a predisposing factor for muscular mechanical performance. Yet, the effects of local cooling on neuromuscular function and performance during gait remain unexamined.Objectives: To investigate the effects of local cooling on lower leg muscles’ isometric maximal force production, electromyography (EMG) and gait ground reaction force. Methods: Experimental study, within subject design. Sixteen healthy university students, age (mean ± SD) 27.0±2.9 years participated in the study. The local cooling was induced by immersing both lower legs up to knee for 20 min in cold water (10°C) in a climate chamber. Electromyographic (EMG) activities and the ankle dorsi and plantar flexors maximum isometric forces were measured in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis muscle by using surface electrodes and dynamometer. Ground reaction forces during gait were measured on a walkway with force plate.Results: There was a significantly reduced isometric maximum force in tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (P<.001) after cooling. The mean EMG amplitude of gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle was significantly increased after cooling (P<.003). There were no significant changes in ground reaction forces and RCOF in gait trials after 20 min cooling.Conclusion: Neuromuscular performances were partly altered after cooling. Maximum strength loss occurred in dorsi-flexion. Fatigued, over-exerted power loss was observed in EMG during plantar flexion. These muscular changes did not contribute significantly to normal gait ground reaction forces on dry and level surface. These may indicate that 20 min cooling in the cold water at 10°C can influence our maximum muscle performance, but the cooling may not be strong enough to impact our daily general and sub maximal activities.KeywordsPeripheral cooling, Ground reaction force, Required coefficient of friction, Gait, Muscle maximum performance, EMG. (Less)
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Peripheral cooling, Ground Reaction force, Gait, Muscle maximum performance, EMG, Required coefficient of friction
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English
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yes
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edae4d16-05c1-485a-a7cf-5f75df1fd3e4
date added to LUP
2018-07-04 10:25:50
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2019-07-17 14:40:49
@misc{edae4d16-05c1-485a-a7cf-5f75df1fd3e4,
  abstract     = {Background: Temperature is considered as a significant determinant of skeletal muscle function and also a predisposing factor for muscular mechanical performance. Yet, the effects of local cooling on neuromuscular function and performance during gait remain unexamined.Objectives: To investigate the effects of local cooling on lower leg muscles’ isometric maximal force production, electromyography (EMG) and gait ground reaction force. Methods: Experimental study, within subject design. Sixteen healthy university students, age (mean ± SD) 27.0±2.9 years participated in the study. The local cooling was induced by immersing both lower legs up to knee for 20 min in cold water (10°C) in a climate chamber. Electromyographic (EMG) activities and the ankle dorsi and plantar flexors maximum isometric forces were measured in tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius medialis muscle by using surface electrodes and dynamometer. Ground reaction forces during gait were measured on a walkway with force plate.Results: There was a significantly reduced isometric maximum force in tibialis anterior (TA) muscle (P&lt;.001) after cooling. The mean EMG amplitude of gastrocnemius medialis (GM) muscle was significantly increased after cooling (P&lt;.003). There were no significant changes in ground reaction forces and RCOF in gait trials after 20 min cooling.Conclusion: Neuromuscular performances were partly altered after cooling. Maximum strength loss occurred in dorsi-flexion. Fatigued, over-exerted power loss was observed in EMG during plantar flexion. These muscular changes did not contribute significantly to normal gait ground reaction forces on dry and level surface. These may indicate that 20 min cooling in the cold water at 10°C can influence our maximum muscle performance, but the cooling may not be strong enough to impact our daily general and sub maximal activities.KeywordsPeripheral cooling, Ground reaction force, Required coefficient of friction, Gait, Muscle maximum performance, EMG.},
  author       = {Halder, Amitava},
  keyword      = {Peripheral cooling,Ground Reaction force,Gait,Muscle maximum performance,EMG,Required coefficient of friction},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  title        = {Effects of Cooling on Ankle Muscle Maximum Performances, Gait Ground Reaction Forces and Electromyography (EMG)},
  year         = {2012},
}