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Introduction of grass-clover crops as biogas feedstock in cereal dominated crop rotations. Part I: Effects on soil organic carbon and food production

Prade, Thomas; Svensson, Sven-Erik and Björnsson, Lovisa LU (2014) In Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-Food Sector p.1032-1040
Abstract
Changes of soil organic carbon (SOC) ontent can have a substantial effect on greenhouse gas emissions, but are rarely included in crop
production LCAs. SOC content strongly influences soil fertility and therefore crop yields, but is declining in many European soils. The present study investigated if integration of 1-2 years of grass-clover crops in a cereal-dominated crop rotation can increase the SOC pool and how this would impact food production. Results show that when grass-clover crops are integrated, the potential SOC content at steady state will be 41 to 52% higher than in the conventional cereal-dominated crop rotation. The net increase of wheat yields based on SOC improvements indicate that for a crop rotation with one year of... (More)
Changes of soil organic carbon (SOC) ontent can have a substantial effect on greenhouse gas emissions, but are rarely included in crop
production LCAs. SOC content strongly influences soil fertility and therefore crop yields, but is declining in many European soils. The present study investigated if integration of 1-2 years of grass-clover crops in a cereal-dominated crop rotation can increase the SOC pool and how this would impact food production. Results show that when grass-clover crops are integrated, the potential SOC content at steady state will be 41 to 52% higher than in the conventional cereal-dominated crop rotation. The net increase of wheat yields based on SOC improvements indicate that for a crop rotation with one year of grass-clover crops, the initial loss of food production can be counterbalanced due to the impact on fertility of the SOC increase. (Less)
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organization
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Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-Food Sector
editor
Schenck, R; Huizenga, D; and
pages
9 pages
publisher
ACLCA, Vashon, WA, USA
ISBN
978-0-9882145-7-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ede25f09-77fb-4bc7-a0ea-14fa3843972e
date added to LUP
2016-11-30 14:53:59
date last changed
2017-02-01 16:29:43
@inproceedings{ede25f09-77fb-4bc7-a0ea-14fa3843972e,
  abstract     = {Changes of soil organic carbon (SOC) ontent can have a substantial effect on greenhouse gas emissions, but are rarely included in crop<br/>production LCAs. SOC content strongly influences soil fertility and therefore crop yields, but is declining in many European soils. The present study investigated if integration of 1-2 years of grass-clover crops in a cereal-dominated crop rotation can increase the SOC pool and how this would impact food production. Results show that when grass-clover crops are integrated, the potential SOC content at steady state will be 41 to 52% higher than in the conventional cereal-dominated crop rotation. The net  increase of wheat yields based on SOC improvements indicate that for a crop rotation with one year of grass-clover crops, the initial loss of food production can be counterbalanced due to the impact on fertility of the SOC increase.},
  author       = {Prade, Thomas and Svensson, Sven-Erik and Björnsson, Lovisa},
  booktitle    = {Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Life Cycle Assessment in the Agri-Food Sector},
  editor       = {Schenck, R and Huizenga, D},
  isbn         = {978-0-9882145-7-6},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1032--1040},
  publisher    = {ACLCA, Vashon, WA, USA},
  title        = {Introduction of grass-clover crops as biogas feedstock in cereal dominated crop rotations. Part I: Effects on soil organic carbon and food production},
  year         = {2014},
}