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Antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of sodium hypochlorite against Staphylococcus aureus isolates derived from patients with atopic dermatitis

Eriksson, S. LU ; van der Plas, M. J.A. LU ; Mörgelin, M. LU and Sonesson, A. LU (2017) In British Journal of Dermatology 117(2). p.513-521
Abstract

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by an increased susceptibility to skin infections. Staphylococcus aureus is reported to dominate in AD lesions and reports have revealed the presence of staphylococcal biofilms. These infections contribute to aggravation of the eczema. Sodium hypochlorite is known to reduce bacterial load of skin lesions, as well as disease severity, in patients with AD, but the effect on biofilms is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of sodium hypochlorite against S. aureus isolates derived from patients with AD. Methods: Skin biopsies derived from patients with infected AD were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using radial diffusion assays,... (More)

Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by an increased susceptibility to skin infections. Staphylococcus aureus is reported to dominate in AD lesions and reports have revealed the presence of staphylococcal biofilms. These infections contribute to aggravation of the eczema. Sodium hypochlorite is known to reduce bacterial load of skin lesions, as well as disease severity, in patients with AD, but the effect on biofilms is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of sodium hypochlorite against S. aureus isolates derived from patients with AD. Methods: Skin biopsies derived from patients with infected AD were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using radial diffusion assays, biofilm assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we assessed the effect of sodium hypochlorite on S. aureus isolates derived from lesional skin of patients with AD. Results: SEM revealed clusters of coccoid bacteria embedded in fibrin and extracellular substances at the skin of a patient with infected AD. At concentrations of 0·01-0·08%, sodium hypochlorite showed antibacterial effects against planktonic cells. Eradication of S. aureus biofilms in vitro was observed in concentrations ranging from 0·01% to 0·16%. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed these results. Finally, when human AD skin was subjected to sodium hypochlorite in an ex vivo model, a dose of 0·04% reduced the bacteria derived from AD skin. Conclusions: Sodium hypochlorite has antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against clinical S. aureus isolates. Our findings suggest usage of a higher concentration than currently used in bleach baths of patients with skin-infected AD.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Dermatology
volume
117
issue
2
pages
513 - 521
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85021698949
ISSN
0007-0963
DOI
10.1111/bjd.15410
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ee7270fa-b61f-44ad-ba0b-821b013d1c86
date added to LUP
2017-08-22 12:24:17
date last changed
2017-09-03 05:26:18
@article{ee7270fa-b61f-44ad-ba0b-821b013d1c86,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is characterized by an increased susceptibility to skin infections. Staphylococcus aureus is reported to dominate in AD lesions and reports have revealed the presence of staphylococcal biofilms. These infections contribute to aggravation of the eczema. Sodium hypochlorite is known to reduce bacterial load of skin lesions, as well as disease severity, in patients with AD, but the effect on biofilms is unknown. Objectives: To investigate the antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects of sodium hypochlorite against S. aureus isolates derived from patients with AD. Methods: Skin biopsies derived from patients with infected AD were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Using radial diffusion assays, biofilm assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we assessed the effect of sodium hypochlorite on S. aureus isolates derived from lesional skin of patients with AD. Results: SEM revealed clusters of coccoid bacteria embedded in fibrin and extracellular substances at the skin of a patient with infected AD. At concentrations of 0·01-0·08%, sodium hypochlorite showed antibacterial effects against planktonic cells. Eradication of S. aureus biofilms in vitro was observed in concentrations ranging from 0·01% to 0·16%. Confocal laser scanning microscopy confirmed these results. Finally, when human AD skin was subjected to sodium hypochlorite in an ex vivo model, a dose of 0·04% reduced the bacteria derived from AD skin. Conclusions: Sodium hypochlorite has antimicrobial and antibiofilm effects against clinical S. aureus isolates. Our findings suggest usage of a higher concentration than currently used in bleach baths of patients with skin-infected AD.</p>},
  author       = {Eriksson, S. and van der Plas, M. J.A. and Mörgelin, M. and Sonesson, A.},
  issn         = {0007-0963},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {513--521},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {British Journal of Dermatology},
  title        = {Antibacterial and antibiofilm effects of sodium hypochlorite against Staphylococcus aureus isolates derived from patients with atopic dermatitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.15410},
  volume       = {117},
  year         = {2017},
}