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Accessing Information in Order to Manage The Strain of a New Demanding Role : A Qualitative Study of the Next of Kin of Patients after Colorectal Cancer Surgery

Lithner, Maria LU ; Klefsgård, Rosemarie LU ; Johansson, Jan LU and Andersson, Edith LU (2015) In Colorectal Cancer: Open access 1(1:6). p.1-9
Abstract (Swedish)
Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore next of kin’s experiences of
information and their information needs after the patient’s discharge for colorectal cancer surgery.
Methods: Sixteen next of kin were interviewed twice during the first seven weeks
after the patient’s discharge from hospital. The interviews were analysed through qualitative content analysis.
Results: The participants in this study needed to access information so as to
manage the strain of a new and demanding role as next of kin to a person with
colorectal cancer. That role consisted of different parts: managing their own
feelings and anxiety, sharing and participating in the patient’s life and supporting the patient and the rest of... (More)
Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore next of kin’s experiences of
information and their information needs after the patient’s discharge for colorectal cancer surgery.
Methods: Sixteen next of kin were interviewed twice during the first seven weeks
after the patient’s discharge from hospital. The interviews were analysed through qualitative content analysis.
Results: The participants in this study needed to access information so as to
manage the strain of a new and demanding role as next of kin to a person with
colorectal cancer. That role consisted of different parts: managing their own
feelings and anxiety, sharing and participating in the patient’s life and supporting the patient and the rest of the family practically and emotionally. The waiting times increased the experience of uncertainty and made the adaptation to the role more difficult. The participants needed to receive their own information and support in order to be able to handle and balance the situation. They needed to share different parts of the patient’s cancer trajectory with them and have access to the same information.
Conclusions: The next of kin needed to be included more actively in the patient’s
cancer trajectory in order to manage the strain of being a support during the
initial period at home. Participation in the information and the patient’s discharge
planning are crucial in order to help patients regain control after colorectal cancer
surgery. (Less)
Abstract
Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore next of kin’s experiences of information and their information needs after the patient’s discharge for colorectal cancer surgery.
Methods: Sixteen next of kin were interviewed twice during the first seven weeks after the patient’s discharge from hospital. The interviews were analysed through qualitative content analysis.
Results: The participants in this study needed to access information so as to manage the strain of a new and demanding role as next of kin to a person with colorectal cancer. That role consisted of different parts: managing their own feelings and anxiety, sharing and participating in the patient’s life and supporting the patient and the rest of the family practically... (More)
Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore next of kin’s experiences of information and their information needs after the patient’s discharge for colorectal cancer surgery.
Methods: Sixteen next of kin were interviewed twice during the first seven weeks after the patient’s discharge from hospital. The interviews were analysed through qualitative content analysis.
Results: The participants in this study needed to access information so as to manage the strain of a new and demanding role as next of kin to a person with colorectal cancer. That role consisted of different parts: managing their own feelings and anxiety, sharing and participating in the patient’s life and supporting the patient and the rest of the family practically and emotionally. The waiting times increased the experience of uncertainty and made the adaptation to the role more difficult. The participants needed to receive their own information and support in order to be able to handle and balance the situation. They needed to share different parts of the patient’s cancer trajectory with them and have access to the same information.
Conclusions: The next of kin needed to be included more actively in the patient’s cancer trajectory in order to manage the strain of being a support during the initial period at home. Participation in the information and the patient’s discharge planning are crucial in order to help patients regain control after colorectal cancer surgery. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Colorectal Neoplasms, Surgery, Relatives, Information, Discharge, Qualitative Research
in
Colorectal Cancer: Open access
volume
1
issue
1:6
pages
9 pages
ISSN
2471-9943
DOI
10.21767/2471-9943.100006
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eeafd3e0-e969-4db1-b19e-1ffa578dd33b
date added to LUP
2019-06-17 09:37:37
date last changed
2019-06-17 09:49:18
@article{eeafd3e0-e969-4db1-b19e-1ffa578dd33b,
  abstract     = {Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore next of kin’s experiences of information and their information needs after the patient’s discharge for colorectal cancer surgery.<br/>Methods: Sixteen next of kin were interviewed twice during the first seven weeks after the patient’s discharge from hospital. The interviews were analysed through qualitative content analysis.<br/>Results: The participants in this study needed to access information so as to manage the strain of a new and demanding role as next of kin to a person with colorectal cancer. That role consisted of different parts: managing their own feelings and anxiety, sharing and participating in the patient’s life and supporting the patient and the rest of the family practically and emotionally. The waiting times increased the experience of uncertainty and made the adaptation to the role more difficult. The participants needed to receive their own information and support in order to be able to handle and balance the situation. They needed to share different parts of the patient’s cancer trajectory with them and have access to the same information.<br/>Conclusions: The next of kin needed to be included more actively in the patient’s cancer trajectory in order to manage the strain of being a support during the initial period at home. Participation in the information and the patient’s discharge planning are crucial in order to help patients regain control after colorectal cancer surgery.},
  author       = {Lithner, Maria and Klefsgård, Rosemarie and Johansson, Jan and Andersson, Edith},
  issn         = {2471-9943},
  keyword      = {Colorectal Neoplasms,Surgery,Relatives,Information,Discharge,Qualitative Research},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {12},
  number       = {1:6},
  pages        = {1--9},
  series       = {Colorectal Cancer: Open access},
  title        = {Accessing Information in Order to Manage The Strain of a New Demanding Role : A Qualitative Study of the Next of Kin of Patients after Colorectal Cancer Surgery},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.21767/2471-9943.100006},
  volume       = {1},
  year         = {2015},
}