Advanced

SPINART study : validation of the extended magnetic resonance imaging scale for evaluation of joint status in adult patients with severe haemophilia A using baseline data

Hong, W.; Raunig, D. and Lundin, B. LU (2016) In Haemophilia 22(6). p.519-526
Abstract

Introduction: Most previous joint imaging scales for haemophilia have focused on earlier disease stages observed in younger patients. Aim: We sought to demonstrate that the 45-item extended magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) scale is a valid instrument for measuring joint status in adults with severe haemophilia A. Methods: Six scale categories (effusion/haemarthrosis, synovial hypertrophy, hemosiderin, erosion, subchondral cysts and cartilage loss) in two domains (soft tissue [range = 0–9] and osteochondral [range = 0–36]) were evaluated for each joint. eMRI scores were derived using baseline data from a randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial (SPINART). Quantitative analysis of linearity included assessments of the... (More)

Introduction: Most previous joint imaging scales for haemophilia have focused on earlier disease stages observed in younger patients. Aim: We sought to demonstrate that the 45-item extended magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) scale is a valid instrument for measuring joint status in adults with severe haemophilia A. Methods: Six scale categories (effusion/haemarthrosis, synovial hypertrophy, hemosiderin, erosion, subchondral cysts and cartilage loss) in two domains (soft tissue [range = 0–9] and osteochondral [range = 0–36]) were evaluated for each joint. eMRI scores were derived using baseline data from a randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial (SPINART). Quantitative analysis of linearity included assessments of the relationship between scores derived from the eMRI scale vs. the 17-point International Prophylaxis Study Group (IPSG) MRI scale and Colorado Adult Joint Assessment Scale (CAJAS). Results: Patient eMRI scores correlated with age (r = 0.58), consistent with the expectation of arthropathy progression and more severe joint changes in older patients. eMRI scores demonstrated excellent between-reader agreement for overall patient score (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.88) and outstanding agreement for knee evaluations (ICC = 0.95). There was a strong linear relationship of the eMRI score with the CAJAS (r = 0.7). Adding individual bone evaluations for each joint increased the sensitivity of the instrument to detect change at low scores. There was minimal ceiling effect (5% maximum scores for all evaluated joints) compared with the IPSG MRI scale (20%). Internal reliability was good (overall Cronbach's alpha = 0.75). Conclusions: Overall, the eMRI scale represents a valid and reliable measure of joint status in adolescents and adults with severe haemophilia A.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
arthropathy, haemophilia, joint, magnetic resonance imaging, rating scale, recombinant factor VIII
in
Haemophilia
volume
22
issue
6
pages
519 - 526
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:84995917627
  • wos:000388493000004
ISSN
1351-8216
DOI
10.1111/hae.13022
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ef85f6f0-6ba3-42c1-a4e6-e96297ec8422
date added to LUP
2016-12-05 12:41:21
date last changed
2017-11-12 04:26:53
@article{ef85f6f0-6ba3-42c1-a4e6-e96297ec8422,
  abstract     = {<p>Introduction: Most previous joint imaging scales for haemophilia have focused on earlier disease stages observed in younger patients. Aim: We sought to demonstrate that the 45-item extended magnetic resonance imaging (eMRI) scale is a valid instrument for measuring joint status in adults with severe haemophilia A. Methods: Six scale categories (effusion/haemarthrosis, synovial hypertrophy, hemosiderin, erosion, subchondral cysts and cartilage loss) in two domains (soft tissue [range = 0–9] and osteochondral [range = 0–36]) were evaluated for each joint. eMRI scores were derived using baseline data from a randomized, controlled, parallel-group clinical trial (SPINART). Quantitative analysis of linearity included assessments of the relationship between scores derived from the eMRI scale vs. the 17-point International Prophylaxis Study Group (IPSG) MRI scale and Colorado Adult Joint Assessment Scale (CAJAS). Results: Patient eMRI scores correlated with age (r = 0.58), consistent with the expectation of arthropathy progression and more severe joint changes in older patients. eMRI scores demonstrated excellent between-reader agreement for overall patient score (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.88) and outstanding agreement for knee evaluations (ICC = 0.95). There was a strong linear relationship of the eMRI score with the CAJAS (r = 0.7). Adding individual bone evaluations for each joint increased the sensitivity of the instrument to detect change at low scores. There was minimal ceiling effect (5% maximum scores for all evaluated joints) compared with the IPSG MRI scale (20%). Internal reliability was good (overall Cronbach's alpha = 0.75). Conclusions: Overall, the eMRI scale represents a valid and reliable measure of joint status in adolescents and adults with severe haemophilia A.</p>},
  author       = {Hong, W. and Raunig, D. and Lundin, B.},
  issn         = {1351-8216},
  keyword      = {arthropathy,haemophilia,joint,magnetic resonance imaging,rating scale,recombinant factor VIII},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {519--526},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Haemophilia},
  title        = {SPINART study : validation of the extended magnetic resonance imaging scale for evaluation of joint status in adult patients with severe haemophilia A using baseline data},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/hae.13022},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2016},
}