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Air pollution and risk of lung cancer in a prospective study in Europe

Vineis, P; Hoek, G; Krzyzanowski, M; Vigna-Taglianti, F; Veglia, F; Airoldi, L; Autrup, H; Dunning, A; Garte, S and Hainaut, P, et al. (2006) In International Journal of Cancer 119(1). p.169-174
Abstract
To estimate the relationship between air pollution and lung cancer, a nested case-control study was set up within EPIC (European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition). Cases had newly diagnosed lung cancer, accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC exsmokers (since at least 10 years) and never smokers. Three controls per case were matched. Matching criteria were gender, age (+/- 5 years), smoking status, country of recruitment and time elapsed between recruitment and diagnosis. We studied residence in proximity of heavy traffic roads as an indicator of exposure to air pollution. In addition, exposure to air pollutants (NO2, PM10, SO2) was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine... (More)
To estimate the relationship between air pollution and lung cancer, a nested case-control study was set up within EPIC (European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition). Cases had newly diagnosed lung cancer, accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC exsmokers (since at least 10 years) and never smokers. Three controls per case were matched. Matching criteria were gender, age (+/- 5 years), smoking status, country of recruitment and time elapsed between recruitment and diagnosis. We studied residence in proximity of heavy traffic roads as an indicator of exposure to air pollution. In addition, exposure to air pollutants (NO2, PM10, SO2) was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Cotinine was measured in plasma. We found a nonsignificant association between lung cancer and residence nearby heavy traffic roads (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.89-2.40). Exposure data for single pollutants were available for 197 cases and 556 matched controls. For NO2 we found an odds ratio of 1.14 (95% CI, 0.78-1.67) for each increment of 10 mu g/m(3), and an odds ratio of 1.30 (1.02-1.66) for concentrations greater than 30 mu g/m(3). The association with NO2 did not change after adjustment by cotinine and additional potential confounders, including occupational exposures. No clear association was found with other pollutants. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc. (Less)
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organization
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publication status
published
subject
keywords
prospective study, air pollution, lung cancer
in
International Journal of Cancer
volume
119
issue
1
pages
169 - 174
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • wos:000237430200024
  • pmid:16463382
  • scopus:33646520596
ISSN
0020-7136
DOI
10.1002/ijc.21801
language
English
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yes
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f12f9c92-a334-406c-8549-c461349d214b (old id 409550)
date added to LUP
2007-10-20 15:53:53
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2019-08-18 03:37:34
@article{f12f9c92-a334-406c-8549-c461349d214b,
  abstract     = {To estimate the relationship between air pollution and lung cancer, a nested case-control study was set up within EPIC (European Prospective Investigation on Cancer and Nutrition). Cases had newly diagnosed lung cancer, accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC exsmokers (since at least 10 years) and never smokers. Three controls per case were matched. Matching criteria were gender, age (+/- 5 years), smoking status, country of recruitment and time elapsed between recruitment and diagnosis. We studied residence in proximity of heavy traffic roads as an indicator of exposure to air pollution. In addition, exposure to air pollutants (NO2, PM10, SO2) was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Cotinine was measured in plasma. We found a nonsignificant association between lung cancer and residence nearby heavy traffic roads (odds ratio = 1.46, 95% confidence interval, CI, 0.89-2.40). Exposure data for single pollutants were available for 197 cases and 556 matched controls. For NO2 we found an odds ratio of 1.14 (95% CI, 0.78-1.67) for each increment of 10 mu g/m(3), and an odds ratio of 1.30 (1.02-1.66) for concentrations greater than 30 mu g/m(3). The association with NO2 did not change after adjustment by cotinine and additional potential confounders, including occupational exposures. No clear association was found with other pollutants. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.},
  author       = {Vineis, P and Hoek, G and Krzyzanowski, M and Vigna-Taglianti, F and Veglia, F and Airoldi, L and Autrup, H and Dunning, A and Garte, S and Hainaut, P and Malaveille, C and Matullo, G and Overvad, K and Raaschou-Nielsen, O and Clavel-Chapelon, F and Linseisen, J and Boeing, H and Trichopoulou, A and Palli, D and Peluso, M and Krogh, V and Tumino, R and Panico, S and Bueno-De-Mesquita, HB and Peeters, PH and Lund, EE and Gonzalez, CA and Martinez, C and Dorronsoro, M and Barricarte, A and Cirera, L and Quiros, JR and Berglund, Göran and Forsberg, B and Day, NE and Key, TJ and Saracci, R and Kaaks, R and Riboli, E},
  issn         = {0020-7136},
  keyword      = {prospective study,air pollution,lung cancer},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {169--174},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {International Journal of Cancer},
  title        = {Air pollution and risk of lung cancer in a prospective study in Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ijc.21801},
  volume       = {119},
  year         = {2006},
}