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Prehabilitation and early rehabilitation after spinal surgery: randomized clinical trial

Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Jørgensen, Lars Damkjær; Dahl, Benny; Pedersen, Tom and Tønnesen, Hanne LU (2010) In Clinical Rehabilitation 24(2). p.137-148
Abstract
Objective: To evaluate the outcome after spinal surgery when adding prehabilitation to the early rehabilitation.

Design: A randomized clinical study.

Setting: Orthopaedic surgery department.

Subject: Sixty patients scheduled for surgery followed by inpatient rehabilitation for degenerative lumbar disease.

Interventions: The patients were computer randomized to prehabilitation and early rehabilitation (28 patients) or to standard care exclusively (32 patients). The intervention began two months prior to the operation. The prehabilitation included an intensive exercise programme and optimization of the analgesic treatment. Protein drinks were given the day before surgery. The early postoperative... (More)
Objective: To evaluate the outcome after spinal surgery when adding prehabilitation to the early rehabilitation.

Design: A randomized clinical study.

Setting: Orthopaedic surgery department.

Subject: Sixty patients scheduled for surgery followed by inpatient rehabilitation for degenerative lumbar disease.

Interventions: The patients were computer randomized to prehabilitation and early rehabilitation (28 patients) or to standard care exclusively (32 patients). The intervention began two months prior to the operation. The prehabilitation included an intensive exercise programme and optimization of the analgesic treatment. Protein drinks were given the day before surgery. The early postoperative rehabilitation included balanced pain therapy with self-administered epidural analgesia, doubled intensified mobilization and protein supplements.

Main measures: The outcome measurements were postoperative stay, complications, functionality, pain and satisfaction.

Results: At operation the intervention group had improved function, assessed by Roland Morris Questionnaire (P = 0.001). After surgery the intervention group reached the recovery milestones faster than the control group (1—6 days versus 3—13, P =0.001), and left hospital earlier (5 (3—9) versus 7 (5—15) days, P =0.007). There was no difference in postoperative complications, adverse events, low back pain and radiating pain, timed up and go, sit-to-stand or in life quality. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the control group.

Conclusion: The integrated programme of prehabilitation and early rehabilitation improved the outcome and shortened the hospital stay — without more complications, pain or dissatisfaction. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Clinical Rehabilitation
volume
24
issue
2
pages
12 pages
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:75949111541
ISSN
0269-2155
DOI
10.1177/0269215509347432
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2b193a6-0297-4af6-9d3a-d91531d1fb4c
date added to LUP
2018-12-06 15:43:14
date last changed
2019-02-10 05:10:50
@article{f2b193a6-0297-4af6-9d3a-d91531d1fb4c,
  abstract     = {Objective: To evaluate the outcome after spinal surgery when adding prehabilitation to the early rehabilitation.<br/><br/>Design: A randomized clinical study.<br/><br/>Setting: Orthopaedic surgery department.<br/><br/>Subject: Sixty patients scheduled for surgery followed by inpatient rehabilitation for degenerative lumbar disease.<br/><br/>Interventions: The patients were computer randomized to prehabilitation and early rehabilitation (28 patients) or to standard care exclusively (32 patients). The intervention began two months prior to the operation. The prehabilitation included an intensive exercise programme and optimization of the analgesic treatment. Protein drinks were given the day before surgery. The early postoperative rehabilitation included balanced pain therapy with self-administered epidural analgesia, doubled intensified mobilization and protein supplements.<br/><br/>Main measures: The outcome measurements were postoperative stay, complications, functionality, pain and satisfaction.<br/><br/>Results: At operation the intervention group had improved function, assessed by Roland Morris Questionnaire (P = 0.001). After surgery the intervention group reached the recovery milestones faster than the control group (1—6 days versus 3—13, P =0.001), and left hospital earlier (5 (3—9) versus 7 (5—15) days, P =0.007). There was no difference in postoperative complications, adverse events, low back pain and radiating pain, timed up and go, sit-to-stand or in life quality. Patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the intervention group compared with the control group.<br/><br/>Conclusion: The integrated programme of prehabilitation and early rehabilitation improved the outcome and shortened the hospital stay — without more complications, pain or dissatisfaction.},
  author       = {Nielsen, Per Rotbøll and Jørgensen, Lars Damkjær and Dahl, Benny and Pedersen, Tom and Tønnesen, Hanne},
  issn         = {0269-2155},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {02},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {137--148},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {Clinical Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Prehabilitation and early rehabilitation after spinal surgery: randomized clinical trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0269215509347432},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2010},
}