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First Polarimetric Investigation of Malaria Mosquitos as Lidar Targets

Jansson, Samuel LU ; Atkinson, Peggy; Ignell, Rickard LU and Brydegaard, Mikkel LU (2019) In IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics 25(1). p.1-8
Abstract

In this work, we use a novel spectral polarimetric optical tomographic imaging goniometer (SPOTIG) to investigate the scattering properties of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes to aid in their detection and identification in entomological lidar applications. Mosquitoes were mounted on a turn table, on which they were illuminated from different angles with linearly polarized near infrared light and rotated. Thus, aspect-dependent optical cross sections were retrieved in backscatter and extinction mode. The backscattering and extinction properties of male and female mosquitoes were further condensed into a pair of parameters. We investigate the wings and bodies of mosquitoes together and independently, and conclude that the wings of mosquitoes... (More)

In this work, we use a novel spectral polarimetric optical tomographic imaging goniometer (SPOTIG) to investigate the scattering properties of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes to aid in their detection and identification in entomological lidar applications. Mosquitoes were mounted on a turn table, on which they were illuminated from different angles with linearly polarized near infrared light and rotated. Thus, aspect-dependent optical cross sections were retrieved in backscatter and extinction mode. The backscattering and extinction properties of male and female mosquitoes were further condensed into a pair of parameters. We investigate the wings and bodies of mosquitoes together and independently, and conclude that the wings of mosquitoes strongly scatter copolarized light and that the degree of linear polarization of light scattered by insect bodies is independent of the aspect. In lidar measurements, light scattered by insect wings can be separated from light scattered by insect bodies due to the oscillatory wing beats. Therefore, obtaining the scattering properties of bodies and wings independently is of particular interest. Finally, we conclude that 808 nm light is well suited for detecting specular reflexes produced by Anopheles wings, which has large implications for the design of entomological lidar instruments used to study malaria mosquitoes.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Backscatter, Diseases, Imaging, Insects, Instruments, Laser radar, laser radar, Optical imaging, Optical polarization, polarization, tomography
in
IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics
volume
25
issue
1
pages
1 - 8
publisher
IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85050628940
ISSN
0792-1233
DOI
10.1109/JSTQE.2018.2859225
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f2d9bbfe-b270-42c7-b6bc-7aefec2c20d9
date added to LUP
2018-08-20 10:28:07
date last changed
2019-02-20 11:24:27
@article{f2d9bbfe-b270-42c7-b6bc-7aefec2c20d9,
  abstract     = {<p>In this work, we use a novel spectral polarimetric optical tomographic imaging goniometer (SPOTIG) to investigate the scattering properties of Anopheles malaria mosquitoes to aid in their detection and identification in entomological lidar applications. Mosquitoes were mounted on a turn table, on which they were illuminated from different angles with linearly polarized near infrared light and rotated. Thus, aspect-dependent optical cross sections were retrieved in backscatter and extinction mode. The backscattering and extinction properties of male and female mosquitoes were further condensed into a pair of parameters. We investigate the wings and bodies of mosquitoes together and independently, and conclude that the wings of mosquitoes strongly scatter copolarized light and that the degree of linear polarization of light scattered by insect bodies is independent of the aspect. In lidar measurements, light scattered by insect wings can be separated from light scattered by insect bodies due to the oscillatory wing beats. Therefore, obtaining the scattering properties of bodies and wings independently is of particular interest. Finally, we conclude that 808 nm light is well suited for detecting specular reflexes produced by Anopheles wings, which has large implications for the design of entomological lidar instruments used to study malaria mosquitoes.</p>},
  author       = {Jansson, Samuel and Atkinson, Peggy and Ignell, Rickard and Brydegaard, Mikkel},
  issn         = {0792-1233},
  keyword      = {Backscatter,Diseases,Imaging,Insects,Instruments,Laser radar,laser radar,Optical imaging,Optical polarization,polarization,tomography},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--8},
  publisher    = {IEEE--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.},
  series       = {IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics},
  title        = {First Polarimetric Investigation of Malaria Mosquitos as Lidar Targets},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/JSTQE.2018.2859225},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2019},
}