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Antiviral compounds obtained from microalgae commonly used as carotenoid sources

Santoyo, Susana; Jaime, Laura; Plaza, Merichel LU ; Herrero, Miguel; Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene LU ; Ibañez, Elena and Reglero, Guillermo (2012) In Journal of Applied Phycology 24(4). p.731-741
Abstract

Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), an environmentally friendly technique, has been used to obtain antiviral compounds from microalgae commonly used as carotenoid sources: Haematococcus pluvialis and Dunaliella salina. The antiviral properties of PLE extracts (hexane, ethanol and water) were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) at different stages during viral infection. Pretreatment of Vero cells with 75 μg mL -1 of H. pluvialis ethanol extract inhibited virus infection by approximately 85%, whereas the same concentration of water and hexane extracts reduced the virus infectivity 75% and 50%, respectively. D. salina extracts were less effective than H. pluvialis extracts and presented a different behaviour... (More)

Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), an environmentally friendly technique, has been used to obtain antiviral compounds from microalgae commonly used as carotenoid sources: Haematococcus pluvialis and Dunaliella salina. The antiviral properties of PLE extracts (hexane, ethanol and water) were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) at different stages during viral infection. Pretreatment of Vero cells with 75 μg mL -1 of H. pluvialis ethanol extract inhibited virus infection by approximately 85%, whereas the same concentration of water and hexane extracts reduced the virus infectivity 75% and 50%, respectively. D. salina extracts were less effective than H. pluvialis extracts and presented a different behaviour since water and ethanol extracts produced a similar virus inhibition (65%). Moreover, H. pluvialis ethanol extract was also the most effective against HSV-1 intracellular replication. The antiviral activity of water PLE extracts was found to correlate with polysaccharides since the polysaccharide-rich fraction isolated from these extracts showed higher antiviral activity than the original water extracts. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) characterization of the H. pluvialis ethanol extract showed the antiviral activity of this extract could be partially related with the presence of short-chain fatty acids, although other compounds could be involved in this activity; meanwhile, in the case of D. salina ethanol extract other compounds seemed to be implied, such as: β-ionone, neophytadiene, phytol, palmitic acid and α-linolenic acid. The results demonstrate the use of PLE allows obtaining antiviral compounds from microalgae used as carotenoids sources, which gives the microalgae biomass an added value.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
keywords
Antiviral activity, Dunaliella salina, Haematococcus pluvialis, Microalgae, Pressurized liquid extraction
in
Journal of Applied Phycology
volume
24
issue
4
pages
11 pages
publisher
Springer Netherlands
external identifiers
  • scopus:84864120513
ISSN
0921-8971
DOI
10.1007/s10811-011-9692-1
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
f32c1390-1d87-4854-a3f7-ad44e024b7e4
date added to LUP
2017-04-10 10:22:52
date last changed
2017-08-13 05:06:26
@article{f32c1390-1d87-4854-a3f7-ad44e024b7e4,
  abstract     = {<p>Pressurized liquid extraction (PLE), an environmentally friendly technique, has been used to obtain antiviral compounds from microalgae commonly used as carotenoid sources: Haematococcus pluvialis and Dunaliella salina. The antiviral properties of PLE extracts (hexane, ethanol and water) were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) at different stages during viral infection. Pretreatment of Vero cells with 75 μg mL <sup>-1</sup> of H. pluvialis ethanol extract inhibited virus infection by approximately 85%, whereas the same concentration of water and hexane extracts reduced the virus infectivity 75% and 50%, respectively. D. salina extracts were less effective than H. pluvialis extracts and presented a different behaviour since water and ethanol extracts produced a similar virus inhibition (65%). Moreover, H. pluvialis ethanol extract was also the most effective against HSV-1 intracellular replication. The antiviral activity of water PLE extracts was found to correlate with polysaccharides since the polysaccharide-rich fraction isolated from these extracts showed higher antiviral activity than the original water extracts. A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) characterization of the H. pluvialis ethanol extract showed the antiviral activity of this extract could be partially related with the presence of short-chain fatty acids, although other compounds could be involved in this activity; meanwhile, in the case of D. salina ethanol extract other compounds seemed to be implied, such as: β-ionone, neophytadiene, phytol, palmitic acid and α-linolenic acid. The results demonstrate the use of PLE allows obtaining antiviral compounds from microalgae used as carotenoids sources, which gives the microalgae biomass an added value.</p>},
  author       = {Santoyo, Susana and Jaime, Laura and Plaza, Merichel and Herrero, Miguel and Rodriguez-Meizoso, Irene and Ibañez, Elena and Reglero, Guillermo},
  issn         = {0921-8971},
  keyword      = {Antiviral activity,Dunaliella salina,Haematococcus pluvialis,Microalgae,Pressurized liquid extraction},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {731--741},
  publisher    = {Springer Netherlands},
  series       = {Journal of Applied Phycology},
  title        = {Antiviral compounds obtained from microalgae commonly used as carotenoid sources},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10811-011-9692-1},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2012},
}