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Having the wrong friends? Peer effects in adolescent substance use

Lundborg, Petter LU (2006) In Journal of Health Economics 25(2). p.214-233
Abstract
Swedish cross-sectional survey data on young individuals aged 12-18-year-old was used to analyse school-class based peer effects in binge drinking, smoking and illicit-drug use. Significant and positive peer effects were found for all three activities. By introducing school/grade fixed effects, the estimated peer effects were identified by variation in peer behaviour across school-classes within schools and grades, implying that estimates were not biased due to endogenous sorting of students across schools. Further, endogeneity bias due to bi-directionality of peer effects was found for binge drinking and smoking. Controlling for this source of endogeneity resulted in even stronger peer effects.
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
substance use, adolescents, peer effects
in
Journal of Health Economics
volume
25
issue
2
pages
214 - 233
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000236343400003
  • pmid:15964090
  • scopus:33344467923
ISSN
1879-1646
DOI
10.1016/j.jhealeco.2005.02.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Health Economics and Forensic Medicine (Closed 2012) (013040050), Centre for Economic Demography (012019200)
id
f415e1e8-a731-48a0-b7f3-33a753b1a50d (old id 415150)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:10:45
date last changed
2020-12-29 01:43:45
@article{f415e1e8-a731-48a0-b7f3-33a753b1a50d,
  abstract     = {Swedish cross-sectional survey data on young individuals aged 12-18-year-old was used to analyse school-class based peer effects in binge drinking, smoking and illicit-drug use. Significant and positive peer effects were found for all three activities. By introducing school/grade fixed effects, the estimated peer effects were identified by variation in peer behaviour across school-classes within schools and grades, implying that estimates were not biased due to endogenous sorting of students across schools. Further, endogeneity bias due to bi-directionality of peer effects was found for binge drinking and smoking. Controlling for this source of endogeneity resulted in even stronger peer effects.},
  author       = {Lundborg, Petter},
  issn         = {1879-1646},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {214--233},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Health Economics},
  title        = {Having the wrong friends? Peer effects in adolescent substance use},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jhealeco.2005.02.001},
  doi          = {10.1016/j.jhealeco.2005.02.001},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2006},
}