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Course of Grip Force Impairment in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Over the First Five Years After Diagnosis

Rydholm, Maria; Book, Christina LU ; Wikström, Ingegerd LU ; Jacobsson, Lennart LU and Turesson, Carl LU (2018) In Arthritis Care and Research 70(4). p.491-498
Abstract

Objective: Objective measures of function are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate grip strength in patients with early RA. Methods: An inception cohort of 225 patients with early RA was followed in accordance with a structured protocol. Average and peak grip force values of the dominant hand (measured using a Grippit device [AB Detektor]) were evaluated and compared to expected age- and sex-specific reference values from the literature. Separate analyses were performed for those with limited self-reported disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI] score ≤0.5) and clinical remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints <2.6). Results: Baseline average grip... (More)

Objective: Objective measures of function are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate grip strength in patients with early RA. Methods: An inception cohort of 225 patients with early RA was followed in accordance with a structured protocol. Average and peak grip force values of the dominant hand (measured using a Grippit device [AB Detektor]) were evaluated and compared to expected age- and sex-specific reference values from the literature. Separate analyses were performed for those with limited self-reported disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI] score ≤0.5) and clinical remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints <2.6). Results: Baseline average grip force among RA patients was significantly lower than the corresponding expected value (mean 105N versus 266N; P < 0.001). Observed average and peak grip force values were significantly reduced compared to those expected in women as well as in men over time and at all time points. The average grip force improved significantly from inclusion to the 12-month visit (age-corrected mean change 34N [95% confidence interval 26–43]). At 5 years, the average grip force was still lower than that expected overall (mean 139N versus 244N; P < 0.001), and also among those with HAQ DI scores ≤0.5 and those in clinical remission. Conclusion: Grip strength improved in early RA patients, particularly during the first year. However, it was still significantly impaired 5 years after diagnosis, even among those with limited self-reported disability and those in clinical remission. This suggests that further efforts to improve hand function are important in early RA.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Arthritis Care and Research
volume
70
issue
4
pages
8 pages
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • scopus:85044637382
ISSN
2151-464X
DOI
10.1002/acr.23318
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f47e6593-d189-4751-86ab-0b0daf4e0d99
date added to LUP
2018-04-10 11:11:41
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:32:25
@article{f47e6593-d189-4751-86ab-0b0daf4e0d99,
  abstract     = {<p>Objective: Objective measures of function are important in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate grip strength in patients with early RA. Methods: An inception cohort of 225 patients with early RA was followed in accordance with a structured protocol. Average and peak grip force values of the dominant hand (measured using a Grippit device [AB Detektor]) were evaluated and compared to expected age- and sex-specific reference values from the literature. Separate analyses were performed for those with limited self-reported disability (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI] score ≤0.5) and clinical remission (Disease Activity Score in 28 joints &lt;2.6). Results: Baseline average grip force among RA patients was significantly lower than the corresponding expected value (mean 105N versus 266N; P &lt; 0.001). Observed average and peak grip force values were significantly reduced compared to those expected in women as well as in men over time and at all time points. The average grip force improved significantly from inclusion to the 12-month visit (age-corrected mean change 34N [95% confidence interval 26–43]). At 5 years, the average grip force was still lower than that expected overall (mean 139N versus 244N; P &lt; 0.001), and also among those with HAQ DI scores ≤0.5 and those in clinical remission. Conclusion: Grip strength improved in early RA patients, particularly during the first year. However, it was still significantly impaired 5 years after diagnosis, even among those with limited self-reported disability and those in clinical remission. This suggests that further efforts to improve hand function are important in early RA.</p>},
  author       = {Rydholm, Maria and Book, Christina and Wikström, Ingegerd and Jacobsson, Lennart and Turesson, Carl},
  issn         = {2151-464X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {04},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {491--498},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Arthritis Care and Research},
  title        = {Course of Grip Force Impairment in Patients With Early Rheumatoid Arthritis Over the First Five Years After Diagnosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acr.23318},
  volume       = {70},
  year         = {2018},
}