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Host Selection by Bark Beetles: Playing the Odds in a High-Stakes Game

Raffa, K. F.; Andersson, Martin N LU and Schlyter, Fredrik (2016) In Advances in Insect Physiology 50. p.1-74
Abstract
Bark beetles face challenges and trade-offs during host selection, imposed by lethal tree
defences, lower nutrition and higher competition in less well-defended trees, scarcity
and ephemeral distribution of susceptible hosts, limitation of suitable hosts to one beetle
generation, and relatively short lifespan and vulnerability of adults during host
searching. Beetles contend with these challenges by using multiple, integrated sensory
modalities, and sequential decision making. They incorporate both negative and positive
information at multiple scales to locate susceptible hosts across large and heterogeneous
landscapes. Some of the olfactory sensory neurons that convey non-host
signals are relatively broadly... (More)
Bark beetles face challenges and trade-offs during host selection, imposed by lethal tree
defences, lower nutrition and higher competition in less well-defended trees, scarcity
and ephemeral distribution of susceptible hosts, limitation of suitable hosts to one beetle
generation, and relatively short lifespan and vulnerability of adults during host
searching. Beetles contend with these challenges by using multiple, integrated sensory
modalities, and sequential decision making. They incorporate both negative and positive
information at multiple scales to locate susceptible hosts across large and heterogeneous
landscapes. Some of the olfactory sensory neurons that convey non-host
signals are relatively broadly tuned, whereas those that underlie intraspecific communication
and host quality assessment are more specific, an arrangement that maximizes
the use of antennal space while retaining high fidelity of detection channels strongly
linked to survival and reproduction. The pertinent co-localization of neurons within sensilla
provides the means for odour mixture processing in the periphery and enhances
odour source discrimination and evaluation of chemical ratios in host tissue. Bark beetles
show high behavioural plasticity in their orientation sequences, which allows them
to adjust to environmental variability. This plasticity is modulated by environmental,
genetic, and geneenvironment drivers. Behavioural plasticity allows individuals to
best realize the benefits that can be derived from pheromone-mediated cooperative
attacks when populations are high. Cross-scale linkages among neurons, sensilla,
orientation sequences, populations, and habitat structure underlie the landscape-scale
environmental and socioeconomic impacts bark beetles exert. They also underlie rapid
outbreaks in response to human-induced environmental alterations, such as climate
change, habitat manipulation, and global transport. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
semiochemicals, host selection
in
Advances in Insect Physiology
editor
Tittiger, Claus; Blomquist, Gary J.; and
volume
50
pages
1 - 74
publisher
Oxford Academic Press
external identifiers
  • scopus:84962527386
ISBN
978-0-12-802723-3
DOI
10.1016/bs.aiip.2016.02.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f57e68f7-55b2-421b-8b7d-e2624efe18e4
date added to LUP
2016-06-10 09:07:22
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:51:58
@inbook{f57e68f7-55b2-421b-8b7d-e2624efe18e4,
  abstract     = {Bark beetles face challenges and trade-offs during host selection, imposed by lethal tree<br/>defences, lower nutrition and higher competition in less well-defended trees, scarcity<br/>and ephemeral distribution of susceptible hosts, limitation of suitable hosts to one beetle<br/>generation, and relatively short lifespan and vulnerability of adults during host<br/>searching. Beetles contend with these challenges by using multiple, integrated sensory<br/>modalities, and sequential decision making. They incorporate both negative and positive<br/>information at multiple scales to locate susceptible hosts across large and heterogeneous<br/>landscapes. Some of the olfactory sensory neurons that convey non-host<br/>signals are relatively broadly tuned, whereas those that underlie intraspecific communication<br/>and host quality assessment are more specific, an arrangement that maximizes<br/>the use of antennal space while retaining high fidelity of detection channels strongly<br/>linked to survival and reproduction. The pertinent co-localization of neurons within sensilla<br/>provides the means for odour mixture processing in the periphery and enhances<br/>odour source discrimination and evaluation of chemical ratios in host tissue. Bark beetles<br/>show high behavioural plasticity in their orientation sequences, which allows them<br/>to adjust to environmental variability. This plasticity is modulated by environmental,<br/>genetic, and geneenvironment drivers. Behavioural plasticity allows individuals to<br/>best realize the benefits that can be derived from pheromone-mediated cooperative<br/>attacks when populations are high. Cross-scale linkages among neurons, sensilla,<br/>orientation sequences, populations, and habitat structure underlie the landscape-scale<br/>environmental and socioeconomic impacts bark beetles exert. They also underlie rapid<br/>outbreaks in response to human-induced environmental alterations, such as climate<br/>change, habitat manipulation, and global transport.},
  author       = {Raffa, K. F. and Andersson, Martin N and Schlyter, Fredrik},
  editor       = {Tittiger, Claus and Blomquist, Gary J.},
  isbn         = {978-0-12-802723-3},
  keyword      = {semiochemicals,host selection},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--74},
  publisher    = {Oxford Academic Press},
  series       = {Advances in Insect Physiology},
  title        = {Host Selection by Bark Beetles: Playing the Odds in a High-Stakes Game},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/bs.aiip.2016.02.001},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2016},
}